Aberdeen university creative writing society

How To Write Discussion In Literature Review:Aberdeen university creative writing society

About the Alliance. The Aberdeen-Curtin Alliance draws on the strengths of both universities to deliver research and coursework programs across a range of disciplines. The Global Energy Institute. Read more. Research activity. Pause: pay to write essay cheap writing about time and change 30 April. The Creative Arts Strand of the Aberdeen-Curtin Alliance recently launched Pause: new writing about time and change, a collection of 18 new works of f Fully funded collaborative PhD Scholarships 22 November.

Opportunities for fully funded collaborative PhD Scholarships Entry Global universities, global impact. A unique opportunity to study in the U This special issue of the international open-acces University wins funding for renewables research 20 August. Collaborative PhD Scholarships 15 November.

Opportunities for fully funded collaborative PhD scholarships in Global universities, global impact. Aberdeen university creative writing society unique opportunity to study in the UK and Universities form strategic alliance to help solve global issues 22 February. Curtin Aberdeen university creative writing society and the University of Aberdeen have joined forces to deliver high-impact research and innovative teaching programs across four key a Global Universities. Global Impact. Back Top.



Aberdeen university creative writing society



English with Creative Writing at Aberdeen gives you all the advantages of a highly-rated teaching, research and creative hub, teaching by acclaimed writers and poets at Scotland's top centre for creative writing, and the opportunity to develop your own writing in the wonderful environment of a historic university with an award-winning library and priceless literary treasures, and a vigorous calendar of literary events.

Aberdeen is a leading centre for the study of literature, language and creative writing, rated second in the UK for its research output and top in Scotland for creative writing. Your Creative Writing studies will develop your understanding of - and practical skills in - the writing of prose fiction, poetry and creative non-fiction.

This compulsory evaluation is designed to find out if your academic writing is of a sufficient standard to enable you to succeed at university and, if you need it, to provide support to improve.

It is completed on-line via MyAberdeen with clear instructions to guide you through it. If you pass the evaluation at the first assessment it will not take much of your time.

If you do not, you will be provided with resources to help you improve. This evaluation does not carry credits but if you do not complete it this will be recorded on your degree transcript. This course, which is prescribed for level 1 undergraduate students and articulating students who are in their first year at the University , is studied entirely online, takes approximately hours to complete and can be taken in one sitting, or spread across a number of weeks.

Topics include orientation overview, equality and diversity, health, safety and cyber security and how to make the most of your time at university in relation to careers and employability.

This course introduces students to the study of English by exploring the dynamic relationship between author, reader and text in a series of classic works of fiction and poetry.

It covers a broad historical range from Folk Tales and ballads to 21st century postmodernity and offers a basic grounding in key elements of literary theory, literary history and the varieties of literary form. Literature can provoke, offend and disturb as well as entertain. This course considers some of the most powerful and controversial works of modern literature. It examines the circumstances of publication, the nature of the controversy, and the cultural and critical impact of each work.

The course shows how poems, plays and novels can raise searching questions about national, racial and personal identity, and looks at the methods used by writers to challenge their readers, as well the responses of readers to such challenges. So you think you know Shakespeare? This course invites you to think again. Studying a range of plays we get behind the mythology of Shakespeare, and rediscover the dynamic inventiveness of the Elizabethan theatre. Shakespeare and his contemporaries were the principal players in a period of literary experimentation that reinvented the possibilities of literature.

Encounters with Shakespeare is your chance to find out more. This course traces the use of key Western myths from antiquity to the present to examine the way knowledge is often presented as both dangerous and compelling. As well as introducing students to a range of historical, social, and formal variations on the theme of knowledge, the course also highlights the role of storytelling and adaptation in the formation of knowledge and understanding. This course offers students the opportunity, through lectures and interactive workshops, to develop their understanding of, and practical skills in, the writing of prose fiction, poetry and creative non-fiction.

Taught by widely published, award-winning writers, it provides a thorough, practice-based understanding of creative process and of the technical challenges involved in developing an original idea into a completed literary artefact, presented to a professional standard. This course explores the poetry, drama and prose of a period often referred to as the golden age of English literature.

A period which saw Shakespeare and his contemporaries produce innovative new literary works in which the language of desire took centre stage. An introduction to late medieval-literature, challenging modern assumptions about the medieval and exploring the diverse range of medieval literary culture, from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales to the autobiographical narrative of Margery Kempe and surprising profanity of medieval lyric.

This level-three course offers an introduction to American literature and culture between and , a century in which the United States was transformed from a rural economy to an industrialised super-power. You will learn about the key writers of this period, the issues that sparked their imaginations, and the literary strategies which they adopted, or at times invented, to express their response to the changing world around them.

This course is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars. While the short story is often said to have developed in America, nineteenth-century Scottish writing is in fact instrumental in the emergence of the form. Often drawing on oral and folk traditions Scottish writers in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries employ the supernatural, or our fear of it, to explore subjects such as guilt, fear, remorse and the extent to which we can control our own destinies.

This course will explore the ways in which the short story in Scotland develops from the early nineteenth century until the beginning of the twentieth. The Romantic movement swept Europe in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries and produced some of the most innovative and exciting literature that has ever been seen. This rule breaking art helped shape the way that we consider art today and underpins many of our ideas about imagination, originality, creativity and self-expression.

This course will explore the ways in which the Romantic movement manifested itself across Britain and Ireland and will consider writers such as Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Scott, Austen and Byron. The early twentieth century was a time of great literary experimentation as literary modernists rose to the challenge to make it new.

The course will examine a range of writers, genres, movements and locations which prompt us to consider what, when and where was modernism. How is the artist to respond when the virtual becomes the real and when words cannot carry the weight of trauma? How can an author avoid the accusations of voyeuristic prurience or crass opportunism when he or she attempts to re-present events of public violence?

This multi-disciplinary course examines work from a wide range of modes, including fiction, poetry, film and graphic art, and looks at the difficulties of inscribing trauma and the ethics and praxis of remembrance. Key events covered include the Holocaust, the Sabra and Shatila massacre, , the Gulf War and the conflict in the Balkans.

This course offers an overview of a wide range of twentieth-century Scottish literature, focusing on themes of haunting, death, and place. Including novels, short stories, poetry, and drama, the course explores questions of the relationship between self and society, the legacy of the past, and the formation of gendered and regional identities.

There are lots of ghosts. Literature has the power to reimagine society. The course will explore how poetry, drama and other literary forms across the century sought new literary approaches to meet the challenges of these times. We will examine different literary strategies adopted by authors to engage with their times, from those who drew upon classical precedent to others who brought new voices, and new publics, into the forum of literature.

The Romantic and Victorian periods were ones of remarkable activity for British citizens abroad. Imperial expansion, increasing international trade, major conflicts and growing mass migration all drew more British citizens than ever into contact with the wider world. This course explores the footprints left by these interactions in nineteenth-century literature: critically examining how Britain saw the world and how the English-speaking world saw Britain during a century of unprecedented international activity.

This course will combine canonical writers of empire and migration with less well-known accounts of the period. The course will apply a range of critical lenses to this material offering students an introduction to key concepts and debates from nation theory, settler studies and postcolonial studies.

This module covers some of the most prominent and popular genres of the Victorian period, including realism, detective fiction, sensation fiction, the ghost story and the social problem novel. Wells, we will think about how writers help to create and challenge generic boundaries. This course will provide students with the opportunity to write an extended folio of creative work in either poetry or prose. It will provide students with the opportunity to explore and extend their creative ambitions in writing and, through the reflective commentary element, enable them to contextualise their own creative achievements in relation to works by established writers.

Throughout the evolution of the folio, the student will develop a thorough practical awareness of some of the key stylistic, formal and expressive possibilities available to the skilled creative writer.

This course will focus on the practical techniques of writing short stories, extended fiction and some poetry. It will encourage students to consider assembling a block of skills which they will require to repeatedly construct functioning narratives. The course will examine the practical skills of creating subtle fictional depictions — or high drama — and consider how we establish what is at stake for the readers of our fiction.

By the completion of the course, students will have assembled a skill set to tackle creative work in a variety of modes, and present and structure it to a professional level. This course begins by considering the theatre that gave us Marlowe and Shakespeare, among other major dramatists, as an institution actively engaged in the controversies of politics and religion of the age. Part 1 of the course focuses on the plays of Christopher Marlowe, whose controversial life is unusually well documented and whose plays starkly anticipate later tensions in Elizabethan and Jacobean drama.

Part 2 considers how those tensions in politics and religion developed in later drama, giving particular attention to the genre of revenge tragedy. The module looks at a wide range of Spenser's work in different genres, including a substantial proportion of his epic poem, and studies this in the contexts of contemporary political history, Spenser's biography, and the literary traditions stemming from Virgil and Petrarch. This course explores the work of women writers with particular emphasis on the role of place focused mostly, but not exclusively, on modernist women writers from the first half of the twentieth century.

We will look at a number of different environments including urban, rural, wild, domestic, trans-national and mythic spaces. We will analyse place in relation to a number of other themes such as gender, sexuality, race, spirituality and creativity. We will read a number of canonical and lesser known women writers, working across various genres, including fiction, poetry and life-writing.

Previous study of modernism is not required. It was also the period when psychology was recognised as a distinct discipline and sought to establish a science of the mind. The literature of the period both informed and drew on new understandings of how the mind worked, and of how the mind was influenced by heredity, sexuality and a social environment being reshaped by new technologies — such as electric light and the telephone — and by the rapid globalisation produced by European colonialism.

The literature of the period reflected — and reflected on — these transformations and sought new forms and styles by which to give them expression. We will explore the ramifications of these issues in the literature of the period and the ways in which writers responded to an increasingly mass market for literature.

Scotland's history is one of violence, bloodshed and trauma. This is reflected in its literature, above all in the fiction of the nineteenth century. Focusing on pivotal moments of upheaval in Scotland's past such as the Covenanting Wars and the Jacobite Risings this course will explore the ways in which these violent events are reflected in the works of writers such as Walter Scott, James Hogg, Robert Louis Stevenson and those in the modern period who have inherited their legacy.

Exploring key concepts such as how the novel might approach and engage with the past, the extent to which it may operate as a form of commemoration and the limits which traumatic events place upon forms of narration, the course will examine the ways in which we can comprehend and remember a nation's violent history through the form of the novel. This course considers how the artists framed these dilemmas and how they have been framed by them.

Following the outbreak of peace in the province, the role of artists changed: their work now focused on the victims of violence and to demand justice. This course looks at how eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Gothic Fiction confronts themes and concepts which are considered taboo, unpleasant or strictly.

Sexuality and mortality are key themes here, as well as the crossing of class, racial and gender boundaries. We explore how the Gothic can be simultaneously deeply conservative and shockingly radical, and speaks to private fears and desires whilst bringing to public light social injustices and inequalities.

This course focuses mainly on the Gothic novel, but may also include poetry and short stories. This course focuses on the emphasis on sameness in conceptions of love and friendship within medieval and early modern literature, exploring its implications for the history of sexuality, and its impact on political ideology.

Creative Writing: The Writer's Voice will focus on the crucial and often complex role of voice in fiction and poetry, considering both theoretical and practical aspects. It offers students the opportunity to develop their creative processes and practical literary skills in a supportive, constructive learning environment. Teaching consists of carefully targeted critical advice and guidance from the class tutor and peer evaluation from class members in a workshop environment.

Examples of writing by recognised authors and class members will be used to enhance students' awareness of the key role of voice in imaginative writing, leading to practical application in their own creative work.

This course will explore the work of some of the most infuential and innovative voices in 20th century British poetry. Drama was the entertainment phenomenon of the early modern period: a popular art form that developed swiftly and attracted mass audiences.

London was both the city that played host to this new cultural form, and the subject of much of its output. The course will examine the relation between life in the early modern city and the great flowering of drama by celebrated authors of the period. Using works by well-known writers such as Middleton, Jonson and Shakespeare, as well as lesser known authors, we will explore how the plays of the period engage with key concerns of urban living.

This course examines the development of the short story during the last two hundred years, e. The course will consider the distinctiveness of the short story as an art form, its techniques and applications, and the factors that have influenced its evolution.

This course explores the relationship between literature and medicine, and asks what kind of ground the two disciplines might share and how they might enrich one another.

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Here's a new; creative writing group creative writing society for a mile radius of. Aberdeen is a leading centre for the study of literature, language and creative writing, rated second in the UK for its research output and top in Scotland for creative writing. Your Creative Writing studies will develop your understanding of - and practical skills in - the writing of prose fiction, poetry and creative non-fiction. This compulsory evaluation is designed to find out if your academic writing is of a sufficient standard to enable you to succeed at university and, if you need it, to provide support to improve.

It is completed on-line via MyAberdeen with clear instructions to guide you through it. If you pass the evaluation at the first assessment it will not take much of your time. If you do not, you will be provided with resources to help you improve. This evaluation does not carry credits but if you do not complete it this will be recorded on your degree transcript. This course, which is prescribed for level 1 undergraduate students and articulating students who are in their first year at the University , is studied entirely online, takes approximately hours to complete and can be taken in one sitting, or spread across a number of weeks.

Topics include orientation overview, equality and diversity, health, safety and cyber security and how to make the most of your time at university in relation to careers and employability. This course introduces students to the study of English by exploring the dynamic relationship between author, reader and text in a series of classic works of fiction and poetry. It covers a broad historical range from Folk Tales and ballads to 21st century postmodernity and offers a basic grounding in key elements of literary theory, literary history and the varieties of literary form.

Literature can provoke, offend and disturb as well as entertain. This course considers some of the most powerful and controversial works of modern literature. It examines the circumstances of publication, the nature of the controversy, and the cultural and critical impact of each work. The course shows how poems, plays and novels can raise searching questions about national, racial and personal identity, and looks at the methods used by writers to challenge their readers, as well the responses of readers to such challenges.

So you think you know Shakespeare? This course invites you to think again. Studying a range of plays we get behind the mythology of Shakespeare, and rediscover the dynamic inventiveness of the Elizabethan theatre. Shakespeare and his contemporaries were the principal players in a period of literary experimentation that reinvented the possibilities of literature. Encounters with Shakespeare is your chance to find out more. This course traces the use of key Western myths from antiquity to the present to examine the way knowledge is often presented as both dangerous and compelling.

As well as introducing students to a range of historical, social, and formal variations on the theme of knowledge, the course also highlights the role of storytelling and adaptation in the formation of knowledge and understanding. This course offers students the opportunity, through lectures and interactive workshops, to develop their understanding of, and practical skills in, the writing of prose fiction, poetry and creative non-fiction.

Taught by widely published, award-winning writers, it provides a thorough, practice-based understanding of creative process and of the technical challenges involved in developing an original idea into a completed literary artefact, presented to a professional standard.

This course explores the poetry, drama and prose of a period often referred to as the golden age of English literature. A period which saw Shakespeare and his contemporaries produce innovative new literary works in which the language of desire took centre stage.

An introduction to late medieval-literature, challenging modern assumptions about the medieval and exploring the diverse range of medieval literary culture, from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales to the autobiographical narrative of Margery Kempe and surprising profanity of medieval lyric. This level-three course offers an introduction to American literature and culture between and , a century in which the United States was transformed from a rural economy to an industrialised super-power.

You will learn about the key writers of this period, the issues that sparked their imaginations, and the literary strategies which they adopted, or at times invented, to express their response to the changing world around them.

This course is delivered through a combination of lectures and seminars. While the short story is often said to have developed in America, nineteenth-century Scottish writing is in fact instrumental in the emergence of the form. Often drawing on oral and folk traditions Scottish writers in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries employ the supernatural, or our fear of it, to explore subjects such as guilt, fear, remorse and the extent to which we can control our own destinies.

This course will explore the ways in which the short story in Scotland develops from the early nineteenth century until the beginning of the twentieth. The Romantic movement swept Europe in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries and produced some of the most innovative and exciting literature that has ever been seen.

This rule breaking art helped shape the way that we consider art today and underpins many of our ideas about imagination, originality, creativity and self-expression.

This course will explore the ways in which the Romantic movement manifested itself across Britain and Ireland and will consider writers such as Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Scott, Austen and Byron. The early twentieth century was a time of great literary experimentation as literary modernists rose to the challenge to make it new.

The course will examine a range of writers, genres, movements and locations which prompt us to consider what, when and where was modernism. How is the artist to respond when the virtual becomes the real and when words cannot carry the weight of trauma? How can an author avoid the accusations of voyeuristic prurience or crass opportunism when he or she attempts to re-present events of public violence? This multi-disciplinary course examines work from a wide range of modes, including fiction, poetry, film and graphic art, and looks at the difficulties of inscribing trauma and the ethics and praxis of remembrance.

Key events covered include the Holocaust, the Sabra and Shatila massacre, , the Gulf War and the conflict in the Balkans. This course offers an overview of a wide range of twentieth-century Scottish literature, focusing on themes of haunting, death, and place.

Including novels, short stories, poetry, and drama, the course explores questions of the relationship between self and society, the legacy of the past, and the formation of gendered and regional identities. There are lots of ghosts. Literature has the power to reimagine society. The course will explore how poetry, drama and other literary forms across the century sought new literary approaches to meet the challenges of these times.

We will examine different literary strategies adopted by authors to engage with their times, from those who drew upon classical precedent to others who brought new voices, and new publics, into the forum of literature. The Romantic and Victorian periods were ones of remarkable activity for British citizens abroad.

Imperial expansion, increasing international trade, major conflicts and growing mass migration all drew more British citizens than ever into contact with the wider world. This course explores the footprints left by these interactions in nineteenth-century literature: critically examining how Britain saw the world and how the English-speaking world saw Britain during a century of unprecedented international activity.

This course will combine canonical writers of empire and migration with less well-known accounts of the period.

The course will apply a range of critical lenses to this material offering students an introduction to key concepts and debates from nation theory, settler studies and postcolonial studies. This module covers some of the most prominent and popular genres of the Victorian period, including realism, detective fiction, sensation fiction, the ghost story and the social problem novel. Wells, we will think about how writers help to create and challenge generic boundaries.

This course will provide students with the opportunity to write an extended folio of creative work in either poetry or prose. It will provide students with the opportunity to explore and extend their creative ambitions in writing and, through the reflective commentary element, enable them to contextualise their own creative achievements in relation to works by established writers.

Throughout the evolution of the folio, the student will develop a thorough practical awareness of some of the key stylistic, formal and expressive possibilities available to the skilled creative writer. This course will focus on the practical techniques of writing short stories, extended fiction and some poetry.

It will encourage students to consider assembling a block of skills which they will require to repeatedly construct functioning narratives.

The course will examine the practical skills of creating subtle fictional depictions — or high drama — and consider how we establish what is at stake for the readers of our fiction. By the completion of the course, students will have assembled a skill set to tackle creative work in a variety of modes, and present and structure it to a professional level.

This course begins by considering the theatre that gave us Marlowe and Shakespeare, among other major dramatists, as an institution actively engaged in the controversies of politics and religion of the age. Part 1 of the course focuses on the plays of Christopher Marlowe, whose controversial life is unusually well documented and whose plays starkly anticipate later tensions in Elizabethan and Jacobean drama.

Part 2 considers how those tensions in politics and religion developed in later drama, giving particular attention to the genre of revenge tragedy. The module looks at a wide range of Spenser's work in different genres, including a substantial proportion of his epic poem, and studies this in the contexts of contemporary political history, Spenser's biography, and the literary traditions stemming from Virgil and Petrarch.

This course explores the work of women writers with particular emphasis on the role of place focused mostly, but not exclusively, on modernist women writers from the first half of the twentieth century. We will look at a number of different environments including urban, rural, wild, domestic, trans-national and mythic spaces. We will analyse place in relation to a number of other themes such as gender, sexuality, race, spirituality and creativity. We will read a number of canonical and lesser known women writers, working across various genres, including fiction, poetry and life-writing.

Previous study of modernism is not required. It was also the period when psychology was recognised as a distinct discipline and sought to establish a science of the mind. The literature of the period both informed and drew on new understandings of how the mind worked, and of how the mind was influenced by heredity, sexuality and a social environment being reshaped by new technologies — such as electric light and the telephone — and by the rapid globalisation produced by European colonialism.

The literature of the period reflected — and reflected on — these transformations and sought new forms and styles by which to give them expression. We will explore the ramifications of these issues in the literature of the period and the ways in which writers responded to an increasingly mass market for literature. Scotland's history is one of violence, bloodshed and trauma. This is reflected in its literature, above all in the fiction of the nineteenth century.

Focusing on pivotal moments of upheaval in Scotland's past such as the Covenanting Wars and the Jacobite Risings this course will explore the ways in which these violent events are reflected in the works of writers such as Walter Scott, James Hogg, Robert Louis Stevenson and those in the modern period who have inherited their legacy. Exploring key concepts such as how the novel might approach and engage with the past, the extent to which it may operate as a form of commemoration and the limits which traumatic events place upon forms of narration, the course will examine the ways in which we can comprehend and remember a nation's violent history through the form of the novel.

This course considers how the artists framed these dilemmas and how they have been framed by them. Following the outbreak of peace in the province, the role of artists changed: their work now focused on the victims of violence and to demand justice.

This course looks at how eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Gothic Fiction confronts themes and concepts which are considered taboo, unpleasant or strictly. Sexuality and mortality are key themes here, as well as the crossing of class, racial and gender boundaries. We explore how the Gothic can be simultaneously deeply conservative and shockingly radical, and speaks to private fears and desires whilst bringing to public light social injustices and inequalities.

Creative Writing Society

edinburgh university creative writing society. html homework help do my research paper. ^ aberdeen university english and creative writing creative writing twists at the arizona state university creative writing faculty. helpmeessay.online Retrieved March 22, During the s the Aberdeen University Creative Writing Society was founded to offer students a platform to share and develop, read, and listen to creative pieces. If you enjoy creative writing and want to get involved, then please do come to one of our weekly meetings. Aberdeen University Creative Writing Society. You will explore how society shapes us as individuals in all sorts of ways and will. Find top-rated essay writing is a literary and/or creative writing society english language entry requirements can combine journalism and english creative aberdeen.


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