Best writing prompts for creative writing

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Writing can be a chore, even the imaginative exercise of creative writing. To open the floodgates of their imaginations, learners can always use creative writing prompts to generate ideas. Below we've got some examples of writing prompts from all over the Web. They're fun and challenging exercises students will love. Learners come up with four different things:. When the list is created, students write a one-paragraph story including each of the four items and a single protagonist they create or borrow from another source.

Students of all kinds often struggle to understand and manage emotions, and exercises like this can help. However, the trick is to not think too much about the answers—try expanding on the first thoughts that pop into your mind. Journalling is one of the best writing and self-expression exercises out there. It's an best writing prompts for creative writing practice that has stood the test of time, and your learners can benefit greatly from it themselves.

The Essential Guide. Inquiry-Based Learning vs. School Wayne state university creative writing. Your cart is websites that help with college homework. With daily practice, the process becomes more enjoyable as they get better and better at it.

Personal Prompts Students of all kinds often struggle to understand and manage emotions, and acrostic poem creative writing like this can help. Why is this memory so happy? What did it mean to you to feel this way? Describe someone that makes you angry. What does the person do to make you feel angry? What does that feel like to you?

Write about something that happened to you that made you feel sad, writing it as though it were a story. Talk about a time that you felt jealous of someone. What were you jealous about and why? Was there ever a point in your life when you were truly frustrated with yourself? Describe how the emotion of frustration affected you both physically and psychologically. Example 1: Who just snuck out the back window? What were they carrying?

Where were they going? Example 2: Who is Ethan? Why is he crying? What is he going to do about it? Example 3: Whose house is Julia leaving? Why was she there? Where is she going now? Best writing prompts for creative writing for Journaling Journalling is one of the best writing and self-expression exercises out there.

Write about going back to school after summer vacation. Write out the best or the worst day of your life. Design some gadget, machine, building, or other creation that might enrich the future. You are to tell a person from a distant creative writing prompts 11th grade or from another era what pollution is. Make that person understand what causes it and why it is bad.

Begin a list of questions that you'd like to have answered. They may be about the future or the past. Did you ever break an important promise?

Imagine that you are an animal in the zoo. What type of best writing prompts for creative writing are you? How do you feel about being caged? How do you feel about people that visit and watch you? Would you rather have a brother or sister? Describe a fight you had with your mother. Now tell it from best writing prompts for creative writing point of view. If you had three wishes, what would they be?

Why do you think it is special or different? Name and describe a teacher who made a difference in your life. What did that teacher do that was so special? Next, use them to create a conversation between two or more characters in a story. Rewrite a famous tale from Shakespeare best writing prompts for creative writing some other historical writer.

Your rewrite can be translated into more modern language, and given a different theme or outcome from the original. Write a letter to yourself in either the future or the past. What are the most important things you'd want to say to that version of yourself? How would you best writing prompts for creative writing them? Create an "alternate history" tale biology homework help discord which the timeline of history is altered by an unlikely event.

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Best writing prompts for creative writing



Jonathan Wlodarski is pursuing a Ph. The demand for creative writing on college campuses is on the rise: A report from the Associated Press reveals that in the last 40 years, more than schools have started creative writing bachelor's programs for students who want to learn how to write fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and work for the stage and screen.

Though overall enrollment in English majors has declined in recent years, Inside Higher Ed notes that the creative writing specialization has remained stable in terms of student enrollment.

Despite the popularity of the major, the debate continues to rage: Can creative writing be taught? According to some, creative writing is an innate talent, and good writers instinctively know how to evoke feeling and meaning through writing. Others argue that students must be taught how other writers construct their work until they have internalized the skills and can produce their own original material. It's the latter of these two assumptions that captures the aim of creative writing classes at the college level.

Though studying creative writing doesn't guarantee you'll land a job after graduation, mastering the craft has a number of benefits. For example, studying different genres of writing and learning to work within their confines sharpens problem-solving skills and teaches students to move freely through different modes of communication. The creative energy required to compose original works can also allow for evocative self-expression, itself an empowering, cathartic process.

While many schools offer creative writing courses, majors, and even graduate-level degrees, it's important to remember that much of the work required to write successfully happens outside the classroom.

Even with the best instructors, students who want to flourish in the world of creative writing must do a fair amount of self-teaching, too. When asked for advice on how to get started or how to improve one's writing, most writers will say the same thing: The easiest way to get better, whether you're self-taught or not, is to read.

Pay attention to how a writer has put together their story. Study the poems or the fantasy novels you like and ask questions about the structure of each work as you consume it. Apply these methods to your own writing — how does the final product change when you make use of another writer's techniques? Having a sense of the piece you want to write can help tremendously in terms of finishing.

In my own experience, the stories I've written aimlessly are the ones I abandon, and the ones for which I had clear ideas and intentions were easy to complete. It's important to understand what the essay you're writing is going to explore or why the screenplay you're writing will make a compelling movie. By defining your expected outcomes, it becomes easier to create a plot outline or even write toward a predetermined ending. Another common piece of advice is the mantra "writing is revising.

Often, it isn't until you finish the first draft that you develop a full sense of what you wrote, no matter how fastidiously you planned what the final product would look like.

Reread your writing, keeping your previously decided goal in mind and asking yourself these questions: How successful is this piece in achieving that goal? What changes can you make that will enable the piece to succeed.

Choose a myth or fairy tale with which you are familiar. Find a new way to tell it by choosing a different protagonist to reframe the narrative. Use the new perspective you've chosen to practice characterization by fleshing out the character's point of view. Observe how the details of the story change from this character's angle. Choose a poetic form that has very specific rules. A sonnet, for example, requires 14 lines of 10 syllables each that follow a particular rhyme scheme.

Try writing a few poems using the constraints of the form you've chosen. The conventions will force you to approach language from new, exciting angles, which can lead you to create more innovative, interesting work. In screen- and playwriting, much of your writing will be dialogue-specific. Record a conversation between you and someone else, then convert that conversation into a script. Transcribing your words will give you a handle on how dialogue flows naturally, which can be helpful if you find the dialogue in your writing is stilted.

Recall a memory you experienced. As you write it down, focus on engaging with as many sensory details as you can. Refining your use of concrete descriptions of sight, sound, taste, feel, and smell can help your readers connect more viscerally to the experiences you're writing about — physical connection to the prose invites the reader to participate in the memory along with you.

One popular technique in poetry is making strange images out of familiar things. Study household objects and items that are very familiar to you, focusing on details that you might otherwise ignore.

What sort of unfamiliar images might you create based on these observations? For example, you might notice the front-facing camera on your phone looks like a single eye — from there, a simile comparing your phone to a Cyclops is born.

Take a novel, story, or memory from your own experiences. Write it not in prose but in a stage or screenplay format.

Pay attention to how information is conveyed differently without a narrator to observe. For example, dialogue becomes more important than descriptions of the environment when a stage or movie set provides the backdrop of your story. Write a short story where a character's life is interrupted by something unexpected that forces them to make a challenging decision.

Work on including information early in the piece that clues the reader in to the decision the character will make in the end. Writing several of these sketches will help you with your character development skills. One of the challenges of writing a memoir is learning how to think outside your own perspective. Which of your behaviors might be strange or unfamiliar to other people? Learning that others may not understand your peculiarities is an important step in writing creative nonfiction.

Practice this by writing in detail about a family tradition you have, no matter how mundane — focus on explaining the reasoning behind each aspect, capturing exactly how it all unfolds.

Find a poem you really enjoy and study it closely to determine how it was constructed — what rhythmic choices do you see? How did the writer employ line breaks to make their poem more powerful? Where is the figurative language, and why did the writer use it where they did? Imitate this poem by writing about a different subject, but stick to the structure of the original poem as closely as you can.

Using these devices in your writing can help you internalize the tools of other writers and learn how to better deploy them in your own poetry. Write a piece of flash fiction a story under 1, words in which a plot twist occurs at the beginning of each paragraph. Let each plot twist build naturally from the information that the story has thus far provided to the reader — the eighth paragraph cannot suddenly reveal the presence of dragons if their existence hasn't at least been hinted at, for example.

Let this exercise teach you about plot: Why do you choose each plot twist, and how does it affect your decisions about the story moving forward?

Creative Writing Tips and Ideas: How to Learn Creative Writing While many schools offer creative writing courses, majors, and even graduate-level degrees, it's important to remember that much of the work required to write successfully happens outside the classroom. Read Books Like a Writer When asked for advice on how to get started or how to improve one's writing, most writers will say the same thing: The easiest way to get better, whether you're self-taught or not, is to read.

Define Expectations and Outcomes Having a sense of the piece you want to write can help tremendously in terms of finishing. Revise With the "Big Picture" in Mind Another common piece of advice is the mantra "writing is revising. Creative Writing Prompts to Inspire You 1. Retell a Familiar Tale Choose a myth or fairy tale with which you are familiar. Write With Strict Conventions Choose a poetic form that has very specific rules.

Capture Dialogue In screen- and playwriting, much of your writing will be dialogue-specific. Engage the Senses Recall a memory you experienced. Observe the Unobserved One popular technique in poetry is making strange images out of familiar things. Adapt Across Genres Take a novel, story, or memory from your own experiences. Create a Character Sketch Write a short story where a character's life is interrupted by something unexpected that forces them to make a challenging decision.

Explain a Family Tradition One of the challenges of writing a memoir is learning how to think outside your own perspective. Poetic Technique Internalization Find a poem you really enjoy and study it closely to determine how it was constructed — what rhythmic choices do you see? Plot Twist Write a piece of flash fiction a story under 1, words in which a plot twist occurs at the beginning of each paragraph.

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25 Creative Writing Prompts

Glad this list helped you in a time of need. Keep writing! A young man attempts to pull a robbery of some kind on an older man. Things go drastically wrong for the young man. Either viewpoint! Heres a gorgeous one! Write a story in the POV of a flower being given from person 2 person. These are great, thanks for putting these up. One of my favourites is: the empty glass.

Good luck to you! Katie, It is never too young to start living your dreams. Keep on writing and believe in yourself that one day you will make it! Best of luck! Kristi, give the prompts a try. The trick is to write something anything rather than sit around waiting for something to write about.

I am 14 and just wanted to do some creative writing, but could not think of anything to write about. Thank you so much for the ideas! I will definitely be using some.

She just inspires me with ideas and stuff. I love your site, Melissa. I check it almost every day. Your prompts and tips are so completely helpful! Thanks so much! I know — such a teenager-y thing to say…but true nonetheless. Thanks again! Writing is hard to juggle at any age. Good luck to you, and keep on writing! Im also fourteen and i love to write! Just keep believing in yourself and who knows where you might go!

I am thrilled when young people are so passionate about writing or any craft, really. Congratulations on your success! One good place to find good story prompts are the obituaries of a large newspaper. One true example: from the Arizona Republic years ago, an elderly gentleman got hit by a motorist one a late, rainy afternoon as he was crossing the street.

I have always imagined what his life had been, what he had experienced, etc. I love these!! Now look into your inner being. What do you truly feel? Well when i get stuck I like to think: What would I do if I were to die in a week? Once I picked everything and it turned quite an interesting story….

Thanks, Violet. I often find that prompts and exercises can be used in different ways. Good luck with your story! I love your site and its wonderful, all-inclusive feel. So, here are my ideas for your list. Possibly with an Amish girl as the protagonist? I also hope to be a great writer some day. Congratulations, Bee, and thanks for adding to these prompts. I wish you the best of luck in becoming a great writer. You are certainly well on your way! I actually saw an animated short based on that premise or something similar to it and found it quite compelling.

A great idea! My college English teacher gave my class this prompt. First Line: John closed his eyes. Last Line: It was a good day for the yellow crocuses. Anything in between. I easily made five pages with that prompt. Have fun guys. Im a 17 year old living in the most secluded area of Kentucky, unfortunately.

I want people to think and find happiness in their lives by doing something they love. My idea of doing this came from being in a depressed state from the past few years as a teen and felt strong enough to overcome it without professional help which is progressing for the good. I found setting goals is a great strategy to stay focused and optimistic about life.

I appreciate your time for reading this and if there is any advice you could influence me with id appreciate that as well. Filmmaking is awesome! I sometimes wish I had taken up an interest in film or photography. The best advice I can offer is to never give up, stay focused, and pursue your goals with heart and soul. I would also advise studying film at college, if you can. Best of luck to you! I am 13 and have been writing since I was 7 or younger, and I am in love with writing.

The first and most important thing that can help with that is to stay healthy: eat right, exercise, and get enough sleep. You may also need to break up your writing with other activities.

Make sure you read regularly! For the time being, maybe you need to write short stories. Writing is a great way to work through emotions; I wish you the best of luck! These are great!!!! Sometimes our feet take over. I think it holds a lot of suspense but it could also be happy and bright, like a sports day or carnival. Thanks for adding these, I am going to try to write a story for each one. Thanks so much for these prompts.

I especially like number two, because I feel like a little bit of positive thinking can go a long way. What is your opinion on fanfictions? I think fan fiction is a great way for young and new writers to explore the craft. Some copyright holders are extremely strict about allowing fan fiction to be published. Others will actually develop and publish collections of fan fiction.

There are also franchises in which fan fiction is encouraged. One of my all-time favorite writers, TV and film writer Damon Lindelof, said in a recent interview that he started out writing fan fiction. Please help me!!! Part of being a writer involves developing self-discipline.

I recommend setting up a reward system. For example, you have to work on the novel for 20 minutes before you can call or text your friends after school. Or you have to finish a scene before you go out to see a movie. These are self-imposed rewards, so you have to discipline yourself. Nobody else can do it for you.

You might also look into participating in NaNoWriMo. The timing is great because it starts in just a few weeks. Then you can write your novel in November, leaving plenty of time afterwards for you to clean it up edit, proof, polish.

University instructors are quite helpful in teaching students self-discipline and good writing habits and practices. Your prompts and the comments have really helped me! Workers froze in their places… Kay frowned as she opened her school locker after school. Down the hall, Alexis and Christine exchanged grins…. These are fantastic!

I used to write all the time when I was in school but not so much these days. These ideas are really going to help once I get started writing again. An hour a day, just writing whatever I want. Just to get me back in the habit. An hour a day is enough to produce quite a bit of writing. I wish you the best of luck, Ashlee! Obviously it is now haha, but these are great!!

Thank you so much for this website I look forward to writing now instead of despairing of that dreaded cursor blinking me to oblivion!! Thank you, thank you, thank you. Blogs have been a boon for writers, and I think more writers should take advantage of the technology. I wish you the best of luck with your blog, Emily. I started creative writing when I was about 10 or I found myself writing more and more when I was troubled a few years back, so it was good stress relief for me.

I was a bit confused with where to start off, but these prompts really got my creative juices flowing. Thanks for the inspiration. Follow it and keep writing! In my junior year of high school, we were given a creative writing assignment to expand on this sentence:.

It would certainly be interesting to see what a whole classroom of people come up with. I imagine each piece of writing would be quite different from the others, even though they are all based on the same premise. Thanks for sharing it, Alli. Prop open the door. I can actually see my breathe tonight. But that doesnt mean im breathing. These writing ideas helped a lot thank you.

I really want to go to a creative writing school when I get older. One idea which I just came up with is Write from the perspective of your fish. Oh also try continuing after this sentence. Its eyes gleamed pitch black death, creeping into imaginary, azure skies.

For school, I have to enter a creative writing competition. I have two days and i was really panicking but then i found this website! It really helped! Thankyou Writing Forward!! I do like your opening line. Nice job. Thank you so much!!!! But now my muse is back! I just want to say that this list of prompts has inspired me to take on a challenge of using one every day up until xmas on my blog… or at least until the end of the month!

That would really stretch your creativity. I love the idea of these prompts helping students with reading and writing. However ever since graduating and entering the real world I find my muse being choked to death by the responsibility at home. Thank you! Hi Rochelle. I remember graduating and entering the real world, and I had a similar experience.

It took a while, but I adjusted and my creativity returned. Thank you for these, I am a writer waiting to hear if a publisher is going to publish my novel. Waiting is so hard and my mind has gone blank. These help to stir the jucies again. When I have to wait for a kid to get to the car I can write and not have to figure out how to start a story. So thank you. What is it about being in a car or shower that makes us more creative?

I always get ideas in those two locations! I on the other hand am not so sure. Sometimes I sit in the afternoon and stare out the window, unable to come up with anything good but I find that ideas flow like crazy at two in the morning with a cup of coffee in my left hand.

Sometimes, we need to stop procrastinating, stop trying to force our ideas, or we just need to allow ourselves to write badly for a while. I believe there are ideas everywhere; the trick is to keep ourselves open to them and be willing to explore them.

Like sometimes peoploe wonder if it will be good enough so they put it off or they dont want people who read it to know something.. Write what you feel. Write whatever you want. I love writing but i find myself wondering will this be good enough? What would someone think if they read it? Maybe thats just me. Thanks for these! They are great exercises and get you to try new ways of writing.

You dismiss it as an illusion, a trick of the light. Or try writing in present or even future tense, instead of past tense. Oh yeah, and one more: 6 Write something from the perspective of the BAD guy, instead of the hero. These are excellent prompts, especially well suited for speculative fiction writers. My favorite is the prompt about seeing something out of the corner of your eye that happens to me sometimes!

Thanks for adding these. Thank you SO much for these exciting writing prompts! They really inspire me. I have one idea for a prompt: Write about a conversation that you would have if were stuck in an elevator with a celebrity or famous book character. I love your elevator prompt! You could also do it with characters from your novel as a test to see how each would behave in an elevator with a celebrity.

That could tell you a lot about your characters. Good one! Lovely ideas, both of these! How do they react when they discover who you are and that you control their destinies? What sort of conversations would you have?

Would you like interacting with your character? Would your character like you? Hannah, I love your prompt idea. What a fun writing exercise: The Character Meets the Author. Hi Ms.

My suggestion would be to read as many mysteries as you can, and watch mystery films and television shows, so you thoroughly know your genre you should still read other stuff too! Study the greats and ideas will come to you! Wow i have writers block i have my charecter but i dont know what the problem is…… help any good title ideas?

The important thing is to keep writing. You can always come back later and add names and titles. A working title can be anything. Good luck! Sometimes all it takes is a little bit of encouragement or approval from even a complete stranger to shift a young writers thought from maybe being able to do something to just doing it.

Best of luck to you…. Thank you so much, Shannon. Your words mean a lot to me. I try to be an advocate for writers and encourage young and new writers to explore their ideas and find their voices. I believe the world would be a better place if we all followed our passions, and more importantly, encouraged others to do so as well. Thanks a billion! Really like the prompts! It was really helpful! Example 1: Who just snuck out the back window? What were they carrying?

Where were they going? Example 2: Who is Ethan? Why is he crying? What is he going to do about it? Example 3: Whose house is Julia leaving? Why was she there? Where is she going now? Prompts for Journaling Journalling is one of the best writing and self-expression exercises out there. Write about going back to school after summer vacation. Write out the best or the worst day of your life.

Design some gadget, machine, building, or other creation that might enrich the future. You are to tell a person from a distant planet or from another era what pollution is.

Make that person understand what causes it and why it is bad. Begin a list of questions that you'd like to have answered. They may be about the future or the past. Did you ever break an important promise? Imagine that you are an animal in the zoo. What type of animal are you? How do you feel about being caged? For instance, if your prompt is to write a story that begins with "The stage was set," you could write about anything from someone preparing to put a plan into motion to a literal theatre stage constructed out of pieces of old sets or something else entirely.

If you're using a writing prompt, it doesn't have to be the first sentence of your story or poem, either; you can also use the prompt as a goal to work towards in your writing. If it's a possibility for you, see if you write differently in different media. Do you write the same kind of stories by hand as you would typing at a computer?

What about if you dictate a story and then transcribe it? Or text it to a friend? Varying the method you use to write can affect the stories you're able to tell. For example, you may find that it's easier for you to tell stories about your life to a voice recorder than to try to write out a personal essay.

Or maybe you have trouble writing poetry, but can easily text yourself or a friend a poem. You might even find you like a writing method you've not tried before better than what you've been doing! If you need more inspiration, feel free to combine multiple prompts but don't overwhelm yourself with too much to write about.

You can also try switching genres from what might be suggested in the prompt. For instance, try writing a prompt that seems funny in a serious and sad way, or finding the humor in something that otherwise seems humorless. The categories we've organized the prompts into are by no means limiters on what you're allowed to write about. For some people, this means writing daily; for others, it means setting aside time to write each weekend or each month.

Set yourself an achievable goal write 2x a week, write words a month and stick to it. You can always start small and then ramp your wordcount or frequency up. If you do better when you have something outside yourself prompting to write, you may also want to try something like morning pages , which encourages you to write at least words every day, in any format story, diary entry, social media postings, etc.

Thinking about attending college or grad school for creative writing? Our articles on whether or not you should major in creative writing and the best creative writing programs are there for you!

Plus, if you're a high schooler, you should check out these top writing contests. Creative writing doesn't necessarily have to be fiction. Check out these three examples of narrative writing and our tips for how to write your own narrative stories and essays. Just as writing prompts can help give form to amorphous creative energy, using specific writing structures or devices can be great starting points for your next story.

Read through our discussion of the top 20 poetic devices to know and see if you can work at least one new one into your next writing session. Still looking for more writing ideas? How to Get a Perfect , by a Perfect Scorer.

Score on SAT Math. Score on SAT Reading. Score on SAT Writing. What ACT target score should you be aiming for? How to Get a Perfect 4. How to Write an Amazing College Essay. A Comprehensive Guide. Choose Your Test. Justify why. Write a paragraph each about: An important childhood experience that character had.

The character's living situation. Two hobbies or things the character likes to do. The room where the character sleeps. An ambition of the character.

These Creative Writing Prompts Will Make Your Students Love Writing Again

Dec 27,  · Top 10 Writing Prompts of 1. Custom Etymology. Write a story or a scene about someone inventing a new word—or, alternatively, giving an existing 2. Unexpected Inking. You are showering one morning when you notice a tattoo on your body that . Aug 07,  · To help you brainstorm, we put together this list of creative writing prompts to give you something to write about daily. {Updated for !} Whether you write short stories, poems, or like to keep a journal – these will stretch your imagination and give you some ideas for topics to write about! These Creative Writing Prompts Will Make Your Students Love Writing Again 4 to 1 Exercise. These creative writing prompts come from Kelly Roell at ThoughtCo. When the list is created, Personal Prompts. Students of all kinds often struggle to understand and manage emotions, and exercises like.


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