Creative writing and accounting

Creative Accounting - Essay Example

Please keep in mind that these are only general guidelines; always defer to your professor's specifications for a given assignment. If you have any questions about the content represented here, please contact the Writing Centers so that we can address them for you. While it may seem that accountants work only with numbers, they are often required to develop pieces of writing.

Accountants need to communicate with their clients and co-workers in order to effectively complete work-related tasks. Hence, writing in accounting is characterized by conciseness and clarity for ease of reading. As an accounting 2nd grade homework helper, you may be asked to compose various types physics homework help discord written documents, such as memos, letters, and written financial statements.

Audience Awareness The intended audience will english literature and creative writing an effect on what you include in the creative writing and accounting and the tone or level of formality. For example, a report to a client will come with different expectations than an email to creative writing and accounting coworker. When onsidering your audience, ask these questions: What is your relationship with them?

What do they know? What do they need to know? Clear Purpose Writing in accounting needs a clear purpose. It should be creative writing and accounting to your audience what and why you are writing. Organization and Navigability Writing in accounting needs to be clearly organized and easy to navigate. Information should be easy for the reader creative writing and accounting locate, and it should come at a point at which the reader would expect. Clarity Writing in accounting needs to be clear and easy to understand.

Again, think about the reader: Who are they? Why are you writing to them? Concision Your writing should also be concise. Provide only relevant information, and write it as simple as you can. Good Mechanics Polished writing is very important in the business and finance world. Your writing has a potentially large audience and should be free of spelling errors and grammatical mistakes.

Proofread everything! As an accountant, you will be expected to compose several types of texts, which serve different purposes and exigencies. No matter what you creative writing and accounting writing, for what purpose you are writing, or to whom you are writing, the above elements should be present. Letters Accountants often compose letters creative writing and accounting clients, government agencies, and colleagues.

Creative writing and accounting letters establish connections and relationships with clients and others in the accounting field, respond to requests and appeals, and introduce changes or recommendations for action.

The formality will vary depending on the audience, the purpose for the letter, and the relationship between the writer and audience.

Once sent, letters also creative writing and accounting records, which are often referred to at a later date; the content and format of these letters will often be set by the firm for which you work. E-mails and Memos E-mails are the most common form of communication in the business world. As an accountant, you will send emails for in-house communication and to communicate with clients and other parties.

You may be asked to compose a memo, which is an informal letter that generally introduces a new policy or procedure or provides a conclusion or solution. Memos are most commonly sent via e-mail. The formality creative writing and accounting the writing in your e-mails and memos will be largely dependent on to whom you are writing and for what purpose you are writing.

Emails and memos should be organized based on the most important information. This information should come first. Reports Accounting reports analyze a financial issue using accounting principles. Reports, generally, are done in response to a specific request or issue. Reports require outside research into the market and professional scholarship. They also should be broken up into clear and well-organized sections, ending with an executive summary.

Reports are usually used in house or are sent to clients. Preferred Bibliographic Style. Email Address: Password: Create an account. Our upcoming events include workshops about job searchescitation stylesand even Digication e-portfolios. Learn more. Are you an SNL student? Check out Designing ePortfoliosour brand-new support site for Digication. Writing in Accounting Please keep in mind that these are only general guidelines; always defer to your professor's specifications for a given assignment.

Introduction While it may do my statistics homework for me that accountants work only with numbers, they are often required to develop pieces of writing. Elements of Successful Accounting Writing There are several things to consider when composing text within the accounting field.

Common Types of Accounting Writing As an accountant, you will be creative writing craft elements to compose several types of texts, which serve different purposes and exigencies.

They also provide tips on formatting. Topics include conciseness, clarity, and revision. There is information on what the accounting field values, what is expected of writing in the accounting field, and many tips on things to avoid. Books The following book is geared towards students in universities and describes written and spoken communication skills.

Crosling, Glenda M. Writing and Presenting in Accounting. Sydney: LexisNexis Butterworths, Heintz, James A. College Accounting.



Creative writing and accounting



Creative accounting consists of accounting practices that follow required laws and regulations, but deviate from what those standards intend to accomplish. Creative accounting capitalizes on loopholes in the accounting standards to falsely portray a better image of the company.

Although creative accounting practices are legal, the loopholes they exploit are often reformed to prevent such behaviors. However, when firms indulge in creative accounting, they often distort the value of the information that their financials provide. Their goal is to make a firm look as successful and profitable as possible and sometimes they will go about doing this by twisting the truth. If a gray area in accounting is found, it may be exploited, even if it results in misleading investors.

Getting caught can ruin a company's reputation overnight. However, some management teams are willing to run that risk, condoning the use of creative accounting because failure to meet short-term expectations of Wall Street or year-end financial targets can have a hugely adverse impact on share prices.

Creative accounting tricks vary in nature and consistently evolve as regulations to police them change. Here are some examples of common techniques:. Laribee Wire Manufacturing Co. Then there is Enron Corp. In the s, the energy, commodities, and services company engaged in all sorts of unethical accounting practices. It hid debt, understated losses and manipulated various financial figures to create an illusion of profitability, before filing for bankruptcy in The WorldCom scandal is another high profile example of creative accounting leading to fraud.

To hide its falling profitability, the company inflated net income and cash flow by recording expenses as investments. Analysts , asset managers , and financial journalists failed to see many of the above scandals coming, proving that it is not always easy to spot questionable accounting practices. However, that does not mean that investors should sit back and do nothing. Being skeptical and reading financial statements a little more closely, rather than just focusing on what management highlight, can go a long way to detecting suspicious activity.

A good starting point is to carefully read company footnotes , assess the reliability of auditors and pay careful attention to any unusual variations in figures. Financial Statements. Investopedia uses cookies to provide you with a great user experience.

By using Investopedia, you accept our. Your Money. Personal Finance. Your Practice. Popular Courses. What is Creative Accounting? Creative accounting tricks vary in nature and consistently evolve as regulations change.

Investors should always be skeptical and read financial statements from top to bottom for any signs of foul play. Compare Accounts. The offers that appear in this table are from partnerships from which Investopedia receives compensation. Related Terms Cook the Books "Cook the books" is a slang term for using accounting tricks to make a company's financial results look better than they really are.

Quality of Earnings Definition A company's quality of earnings is revealed by dismissing anomalies, accounting tricks, or one-time events that may skew the numbers on real performance.

Financial Shenanigans Financial shenanigans are actions designed to misrepresent the true financial performance or financial position of a company or entity. Accounting Convention An accounting convention consists of the guidelines that arise from the practical application of accounting principles. Accounting Practice Accounting practice is the process of recording the day-to-day financial activities of a business entity.

Black Box Accounting Black box accounting is a method used to obscure financial reporting and confuse a financial statement reader without technically doing anything illegal. Partner Links. Related Articles. Investopedia is part of the Dotdash publishing family.

Five Things I Learned in Creative Writing Class

The critical focus of the class will include an examination of endings and formal wholeness, sustaining narrative arcs, compelling a reader's interest for the duration of the text, and generating a sense of urgency and drama in the work.

This course will examine how these literary fragments have captured the imagination of writers internationally and at home. The larger question the class seeks to answer, both on a collective and individual level, is: How can we craft a working definition of those elements endemic to "short prose" as a genre? Does the form exceed classification? What aspects of both crafts -- prose and poetry -- does this genre inhabit, expand upon, reinvent, reject, subvert?

Short Prose Forms incorporates aspects of both literary seminar and the creative workshop. Class-time will be devoted alternatingly to examinations of published pieces and modified discussions of student work. Our reading chart the course from the genre's emergence, examining the prose poem in 19th-century France through the works of Mallarme, Baudelaire, Max Jacob and Rimbaud. We'll examine aspects of poetry -- the attention to the lyrical, the use of compression, musicality, sonic resonances and wit -- and attempt to understand how these writers took, as Russell Edson describes, "experience [and] made it into an artifact with the logic of a dream.

Prerequisite No Prerequisites. Translation Seminar WRIT W 3 pts This course will explore broad-ranging questions pertaining to the historical, cultural, and political significance of translation while analyzing the various challenges confronted by the art's foremost practitioners.

As readers and practitioners of translation, we will train our ears to detect the visibility of invisibility of the translator's craft; through short writing experiments, we will discover how to identify and capture the nuances that traverse literary styles, historical periods and cultures. The course will culminate in a final project that may either be a critical analysis or an original translation accompanied by a translator's note of introduction.

Students do not need to demonstrate bilingual ability to take this course. Department approval NOT needed. Even though the content never changed, the mood always did: aggressive, mild, indifferent, lyrical, sensitive, technical, indirect, deceitful. If, as fiction writers, one of our pursuits is to stylize various forms of information, and to call the result a story or novel, it is also tempting, and easy, to adopt trends of style without realizing it, and to possibly presume we operate outside of stylistic restrictions and conventions.

Some styles become so commonplace that they no longer seem stylistic. Naipaul remarked in an interview that he was opposed to style, yet we can't exactly summarize his work based on its content.

His manner of telling is sophisticated, subtle, shrewdly indirect, and elegant. He is, in short, a stylist. His brilliance might be to presume that this is the only way to tell a story, and to consider all other ways styles. This course for writers will look at a wide range of prose styles, from conspicuous to subtle ones. We will not only read examples of obviously stylistic prose, but consider as well how the reigning prose norms are themselves stylistic bulwarks, entrenched in the culture for various reasons that might interest us.

One project we will undertake, in order to deepen our understanding and approach to style, will be to restylize certain of the passages we read. These short fiction exercises will supplement our weekly readings and will allow us to practice rhetorical tactics, to assess our own deep stylistic instincts, and to possibly dilate the range of locutions available to us as we work.

Fiction Seminar: The First Person WRIT W 3 pts Today, in the age of memoir, we don't need to apologize for speaking in the first person, but we still need to find a way to make a first person, fictional narrative forceful and focused. The logic is different, the danger the same: we must find a form that will shape an "I" account and render it rhetorically compelling, giving it the substance and complexity of literary art. In this seminar, we will begin by reading critical background about the early uses of first-person in fiction.

We will study how these functioned in the societies they commented on, and chart the changing use of first person in western literature from the eighteenth century to today. Through reading contemporary novels, stories and novellas, we will analyze first person in its various guises: the "I" as witness reliable or not , as elegist, outsider, interpreter, diarist, apologist, and portraitist.

Towards the end of the semester we will study more unusual forms: first-person plural, first-person omniscient, first-person rotating. We will supplement our reading with craft-oriented observations by master-writers. Students will complete four to five fiction pieces of their own in which they will implement specific approaches to first-person.

At least two of these will be complete stories; others may be the beginning of a novel or novella or floating scenes. Students will conference several times with the instructor to discuss their work. Does it simply mean that white folks or men or heterosexuals or Americans don't listen to you very much?

This is a reductive way of thinking that limits both minorities and majorities. In this seminar we'll read work that challenges our received notions about "the edge" and who's in it.

We'll read with an eye toward issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality but we'll also think about marginalization in terms of genre, geography, and even personal politics. Our goal won't be to categorize and quantify hardships, but to appreciate some great--though overlooked--writing. And, finally, to try and understand how these talented artists wrote well.

During the semester students will write short fiction inspired by the work they read and the craft issues discussed in class. Fiction Seminar: Make It Strange WRIT W 3 pts Making the familiar strange, making the strange familiar: these are among the most dexterous, variously re-imagined, catholically deployed, and evergreen of literary techniques.

From Roman Jakobson and the Russian Formalists, to postmodern appropriations of pop culture references, techniques of defamiliarization and the construction of the uncanny have helped literature succeed in altering the vision of habit, habit being that which Proust so aptly describes as a second nature which prevents us from knowing the first. In this course, we will examine precisely how writers have negotiated and presented the alien and the domestic, the extraordinary and the ordinary.

Looking at texts that both intentionally and unintentionally unsettle the reader, the class will pay special attention to the pragmatics of writerly choices made at the levels of vocabulary, sentence structure, narrative structure, perspective, subject matter, and presentations of time.

Students will have four creative and interrelated writing assignments, each one modeling techniques discussed in the preceding weeks. An emphasis will be placed on how these writers notice things that others might overlook-- the small, the peculiar, the unexpected-- and then how they transform these seemingly modest things with the force of their attention.

Our goal will be to proceed through these stories at the level of the sentence. Why this quiet pulling back? Much of our discussion will center on why a specific and at times mysterious-seeming choice has abeen made by an author. But we will also from time to time broaden our focus to encompass larger philosophical concerns that are triggered by these questions of craft.

We will talk about the science of attention, false and true lyricism, "the discipline of rightness" as Wallace Stevens once described it and why it is that feeling so often precedes form.

We will not spend very much time exploring the thematic concerns of these stories. Nor will we speak in great detail about whether we find contained within them sympathetic or unsympathetic characters. Instead, the aim of this class will be to analyze the formal elements of fiction with an eye towards refining our own prose styles and towards saying more clearly how it happened that a given text did or did not move us. In this course, we will read both long and short form examples of childhood and youth stories, examining in particular the relationships between narrator and character, character and world setting , character and language and narrator and reader i.

Students will write two papers. An Earnest Look At Irony WRIT W 3 pts In this seminar, we will examine works by several accomplished writers of fiction, and a few crackerjack poets, in order to determine what, precisely, we mean when we talk about irony on the page and what, precisely, we mean when we talk about earnestness.

How are these very different effects and affects achieved? What are their benefits to the student author? What pitfalls, perceived or otherwise, attend the allure of each? What is the relationship of humor to earnestness, and of seriousness to irony? Is the absence of irony really the same thing as earnestness? Does the absence of earnestness somehow necessitate irony? With an eye toward technique, we will attempt to answer these and further questions by time spent among the words of those who fall along, though often refuse to stay put on, the earnest-ironic continuum.

Students will be expected to write three stories or essays throughout the semester, exploring for themselves this treacherous but eminently skiable slope. Advanced Poetry Workshop WRIT W 3 pts This poetry workshop is reserved for accomplished poetry writers and maintains the highest level of creative and critical expectations.

A critic blends the subjective and objective in complex ways. A critic must know the history of an artwork, its past, while placing it on the contemporary landscape and contemplating its future. A single essay will analyze, argue, describe, reflect, and interpret.

And, since examining a work of art also means examining oneself, the task includes a willingness to probe one's own assumptions. The best critics are engaged in a conversation -- a dialogue, a debate -- with changing standards of taste, with their audience, with their own convictions and emotions.

The best criticism is part of a larger cultural conversation. It spurs readers to ask questions rather than accept answers about art and society. We will read essays that consider six art forms: literature; film; music classical, jazz and popular ; theatre and performance; visual art; and dance. At the term's end, students will consider essays that examine cultural boundaries and divisions: the negotiations between popular and high art; the aesthetic of cruelty; the post-modern blurring of and between artist, critic and fan.

Nonfiction Seminar: The Lyric Essay WRIT W 3 pts While nonfiction is perhaps known for its allegiance to facts and logic in the stalwart essay form, the genre conducts its own experiments, often grouped under the term "lyric essays.

Lyric essayists blend a passion for the actual with innovative forms, listening deeply to the demands of each new subject. In this course, students will map the terrain of the lyric essay, work in which writers revise nonfiction traditions such as: coherent narrative or rhetorical arcs; an identifiable, transparent, or stable narrator; and the familiar categories of memoir, personal essay, travel writing, and argument.

The course will be conducted seminar style, with close reading, lecture, and classroom discussion. They will also complete writing exercises and their own lyric essay s , one of which we will discuss as a class. Their final project will be a collection of their creative work accompanied by an essay discussing their choices.

Nonfiction Seminar: Literature Without Writing WRIT W 3 pts The investigative dialogue is among the oldest forms of literature, and it remains one of the most egalitarian and relevant to life. It's simple - comment and response, question and answer - and can be produced by artists, scientists, lunatics, athletes, criminals, and any other human being, from Plato to Oprah Winfrey. The interview is a kind of performative literature, documenting a time, place, mood, and an extemporaneous exchange.

Transcription transforms the off-the-cuff spoken word into permanent, written text, from ear to page, an art form of capturing rather than imagining. Conversational language is also essential to the art of fiction, showing through telling, or explaining instead of organizing our life into this-then-that narratives. Modernism was the age of the interior monologue but the internal debate might be a form more reflective of the 21st century mind. This course will include readings of psychoanalytic sessions, legal court transcripts, celebrity chats, Zen koan talks, philosophical dialogues, podcasts, television talk shows, and fictional interviews.

Students will conduct real interviews and write fictional ones. They will transcribe, listen, and hear literature in the artless, everyday discussion.

Prerequisite No prerequisites required. When she's conducting immersion journalism, she lives with her sources, tries to blend with them. Long-form narrative reporting requires her to ask difficult questions, born from exhaustive research and critical observation. The memoirist reports from the prism of her own experience, casting herself as a character, making meaning of interviews through the fault lines of memory. The biographer is a ventriloquist, often embodying the purpose or quest of another person, and pulling voices and stories from hints and scraps.

In this seminar, students will explore the various kinds of literary reporting inherent to various nonfiction literary forms, unearthing the strategies writers can use to elicit powerful interviews, background stories and ultimately, what it means to author another person's "truth," and discuss the delicate terrains of race, gender and political misunderstanding, interrogating our own preconceptions.

Students will have the opportunity to do some reporting on their own, and will write two short papers. Nonfiction Seminar: Science And Sensibility WRIT W 3 pts Writing about the natural world is one of the world's oldest literary traditions and the site of some of today's most daring literary experiments. Known loosely as "science writing" this tradition can be traced through texts in myriad and overlapping genres, including poetry, explorer's notebooks, essays, memoirs, art books, and science journalism.

Taken together, these divers texts reveal a rich literary tradition in which the writer's sensibility and worldview are paramount to an investigation of the known and unknown. In this course, we will consider a wide range of texts in order to map this tradition.

We will question what it means to use science as metaphor, explore how to write about science with rigor and commitment to scientific truth, and interrogate the fiction of objectivity.

They may never write a second, but in order to be called novelists there always has to be a first. As a result the first novel is a very special animal. Every kind of writer must attempt one and despite vast differences in genre or style there are often many similarities between them.

In fact, one of the surest similarities are the flaws in each book. Before each writer becomes an expert at his or her method, his or her style, there is room for experimentation and unsuccessful attempts. These "failures" are often much more illuminating for students than the successes of later books.

First novels contain the energy of youth, but often lack the precision that comes with maturity. By examining a series of first novels students will learn to identify common craft elements of first novels and how to employ them to great effect in their own writing. Must a story or a novel have one? When is a plot a plot and not just a series of random events, connected by too much willfulness on the part of the author?

How much should coincidence come to bear when designing a plot? Should an overreliance on plot deem a work to be classified as "genre writing" rather than a work of literature? And how, within this context, does one understand F. Scott Fitzgerald's famous claim that "character is plot, plot is character"? This class will attempt to answer these questions by examining the mechanics of plot, and how a machine can become an art form. The syllabus will include a variety of fictional works ranging from the murder mystery to the so-called plotless novel.

In-class discussions and writing assignments will focus on the strategies these different novels and stories deploy as a way to understand structure, sustain dramatic irony, and make use of dramatic tension.

Readings may also include essays on plot by writers such as E. Fiction Seminar: The Craft Of Writing Dialogue WRIT W 3 pts Whether texting, chatting, conversing, speechifying, recounting, confiding, gossiping, tweeting, praying, interviewing, exhorting, pitching, scheming, lecturing, nagging or begging, humans love to talk, and readers love narratives that contain dialogue.

Good dialogue makes characters and scenes feel real and alive. Great dialogue reveals characters' fears, desires and quirks, forwards the narrative's plot and dramatic tension, and often contains subtext. In this course, we'll read different kinds of novels and stories -- from noir to horror to sci-fi to realistice drama to comic romp -- that implement various types of dialogue effectively, and we'll study how to do it.

We'll read essays by masters that explain techniques for writing great dialogue, and we'll practice writing different styles of dialogue ourselves. Coursework will consist of reading, in-class exercises, and two short creative assignments. Departmental approval NOT required. But what is a character, and what constitutes a supposedly good or believable one? Should characters be like people we know, and if so, how exactly do we create written versions of people?

This class will examine characters in all sorts of writing, historical and contemporary, with an eye toward understanding just how characters are created in fiction, and how they come to seem real to us. We'll read stories and novels; we may also look at essays and biographical writing to analyze where the traces of personhood reside. We'll also explore the way in which these same techniques of writing allow us to personify entities that lack traditional personhood, such as animals, computers, and other nonhuman characters.

Does personhood precede narrative, or is it something we bestow on others by allowing them to tell their story or by telling a story of our own creation on their behalf? Weekly critical and creative exercises will intersect with and expand on the readings and discussions.

We will excavate our abandoned work-- subjecting it to maneuvers ranging from the light in touch to the radical; visiting techniques appropriate for the isolation chamber, as well as the collaborative.

And we will examine how poets throughout the ages have approached revision -- including Lowell's changing of words into their opposites; Auden's revisions of his published work from the standpoint of maturity; Plath's 'next poem as revision' technique. Through a close analysis of poems, we'll examine the possibilities of qualitative meter, and students will write original creative work within and in response to various formal traditions.

Analytical texts and poetic manifestos will accompany our reading of exemplary poems. Each week, we'll study interesting examples of metrical writing, and I'll ask you to write in reponse to those examples.

Our topics will include stress meter, syllable-stress meter, double and triple meter, rising and falling rhythms, promotion, demotion, inversion, elision, and foot scansion. Our study will include a greate range of pre-modern and modern writers, from Keats to W. As writers, we'll always be thinking about how the formal choices of a poem are appropriate or inappropriate for the poem's content. We'll also read prose by poets describing their metrical craft. In this seminar, we will look seriously at the object, and think through the forms, processes, and lives of artists as models and inspiration for our own nonfiction pieces.

The writers we will be reading play with genre, style, form, and voice in innovative ways, like the art and artists they are writing to, occasionally using images in their texts or turning their own books and essays into art objects and playful experiments.

An indefinite list of these writers: W. The class aims to stimulate and inspire your own practice through reading and seeing, critically and ecstatically. You will write midterm and final critical responses, as well as submit creative texts every week that respond to the reading, culminating in a final literary work that will be an extension of one of your shorter imitative pieces.

But how do those pesky facts figure in? Demarcating the boundaries of reasonable artistic license is an ongoing debate among writers, editors, fact-checkers, and audiences. Can changing chronologies and identifying details help the writer arrive at a deeper truth about her subject?

Or are the facts intractable? Where do we draw the line between fabrication and artistry? Is there any merit to what Werner Herzog deems "the ecstatic truth? How can we work responsibly with quotes while making dialogue readable?

Just how experimental can we be while earning the mantle of nonfiction? In this class we will read works that take different approaches at mining toward the truth and unpack various distinct points of view on the debate.

Our classes will consist mainly of discussion, with occasional in-class writing exercises and presentations. Students will write reflection papers on the asigned texts throughout the course and compose their own code of nonfiction ethics by the term's end, and examine their own work under this rubric. Known loosely as "science writing" this tradition can be traced through texts in myriad and overlapping genres, including poetry, explorer's notebook, essays, memoirs, art books, and science journalism.

Taken together, these diverse texts reveal a rich literary tradition in which the writer's sensibility and worldview are paramount to an investigation of the known and unknown. Students will write two short papers and have the opportunity to do some science writing of their own.

How do we give it real literary meaning; examine its compositional aims and techniques, its achievements and especially its aspirations? This course will focus on works that we might call visionary - works that combine art forms, genres and styles in striking ways.

Works in which image and text combine to create a third interactive language for the reader. Works still termed "fiction" "history" or "journalism" that join fact and fiction to interrogate their uses and implications. Certain memoirs that are deliberately anti-autobiographical, turning from personal narrative to the sounds, sight, impressions and ideas of the writer's milieu.

Certain essays that join personal reflection to arts and cultural criticism, drawing on research and imagination, the vernacular and the formal, even prose and poetry. The assemblage or collage that, created from notebook entries, lists, quotations, footnotes and indexes achieves its coherence through fragments and associations, found and original texts.

Nonfiction Seminar: Traditions in Nonfiction WRIT W 3 pts The seminar provides exposure to the varieties of nonfiction with readings in its principal genres: reportage, criticism and commentary, biography and history, and memoir and the personal essay. In this seminar, we will explore the creation of the voice of the poem, the wild lyrical I, through closely reading female poets from antiquity to present day, beginning with Anne Carson's translations of Sappho, If Not Winter , all the way up to present avatars and noted sylists such as Mary Jo Bang Elegy , Traci K.

The identity of the poetic speaker remains with inescapable ties to memory and experience as one mode of the lyric, and with the dramatic topes of mask and persona as another. Students will be asked to hear a range of current and classic women poets deploying, constructing and annihilating the self: the sonnets of Queen Elizabeth and the American beginnings of Anne Bradstreet; the emergence in the 19th century of iconic and radicalizing female presences: Emily Bronte, Emily Dickinson, Christina Rossetti, Elizabeth Barrett Browning; and the predominance of 20th century masters who re-invented the English-language lyric as much as they inherited: Louise Bogan, Gwendolyn Brooks, H.

Students will be expected to keep their own reading diary or write letters in response to class readings, as well as select a classic and contemporary female poet for semester-long research. Poetry Seminar: Poetic Meter and Form WRIT W 3 pts This course will investigate the uses of rhythmic order and disorder in English-language poetry, with a particular emphasis of 'formal' elements in 'free' verse.

Analytical texts and poetic manifestoes will accompany our reading of exemplary poems. These letters establish connections and relationships with clients and others in the accounting field, respond to requests and appeals, and introduce changes or recommendations for action. The formality will vary depending on the audience, the purpose for the letter, and the relationship between the writer and audience.

Once sent, letters also become records, which are often referred to at a later date; the content and format of these letters will often be set by the firm for which you work. E-mails and Memos E-mails are the most common form of communication in the business world.

As an accountant, you will send emails for in-house communication and to communicate with clients and other parties. You may be asked to compose a memo, which is an informal letter that generally introduces a new policy or procedure or provides a conclusion or solution.

Memos are most commonly sent via e-mail. The formality of the writing in your e-mails and memos will be largely dependent on to whom you are writing and for what purpose you are writing. Emails and memos should be organized based on the most important information.

This information should come first. Reports Accounting reports analyze a financial issue using accounting principles. Reports, generally, are done in response to a specific request or issue. Reports require outside research into the market and professional scholarship.

They also should be broken up into clear and well-organized sections, ending with an executive summary. Reports are usually used in house or are sent to clients. Preferred Bibliographic Style. Email Address: Password: Create an account. Our upcoming events include workshops about job searches , citation styles , and even Digication e-portfolios.

Learn more. Are you an SNL student? Check out Designing ePortfolios , our brand-new support site for Digication. Writing in Accounting Please keep in mind that these are only general guidelines; always defer to your professor's specifications for a given assignment.

Introduction While it may seem that accountants work only with numbers, they are often required to develop pieces of writing. Elements of Successful Accounting Writing There are several things to consider when composing text within the accounting field. Common Types of Accounting Writing As an accountant, you will be expected to compose several types of texts, which serve different purposes and exigencies. They also provide tips on formatting. Topics include conciseness, clarity, and revision.

There is information on what the accounting field values, what is expected of writing in the accounting field, and many tips on things to avoid. Books The following book is geared towards students in universities and describes written and spoken communication skills. Crosling, Glenda M.

Creative Accounting

Creative Writing is one of the trendiest fields on the online job market. More and more people are engaging in it to earn extra cash right from their homes. However, coming up with a creative script, story or article requires high levels of expertise and not any jack can compile an attractive article. Hire Creative . Writing in accounting is not limited to descriptive works, but also includes argumentative and/or analytical pieces. In other words, you may be asked to apply concepts learned in class to specific accounting situations and/or develop an argument around accounting . Nov 06,  · In creative writing class, I learned to freewrite every day as part of my writing practice and as a tool to generate raw material for poetry and story ideas. It had a huge impact on my writing and marked a time when my work and my writing practices went through dramatic improvements. 2. Some people work out with weights; we do writing Missing: accounting.


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