Homework proven to not help

Homework: New Research Suggests It May Be an Unnecessary Evil

Today, kindergarten to fifth graders have an average of 2. Proponents of homework say that homework proven to not help improves student achievement and allows for independent learning of classroom and life skills. Opponents of homework say that too much may be harmful for students as it can wea creative writing hebden bridge stress, reduce leisure and sleep time, and homework proven to not help to cheating.

They also say that it widens social inequality and is not proven to be beneficial for younger children. Studies show that homework improves student achievement in terms of improved grades, test results, and the likelihood to attend college. Research by the Institute for the Study of Labor IZA concluded that increased homework led to better GPAs and higher probability of college attendance for high school boys.

In fact, boys who attended college did more than three hours of additional homework per week in high school. Everyone knows that practice makes perfect. Thanks to take-home assignments, parents are able to track what their children are learning at school as well as their literature review on gene editing strengths and weaknesses.

Data from a nationwide sample of elementary school students show that parental involvement in homework can improve class performance, especially among economically disadvantaged African-American and Hispanic homework proven to not help. Homework can also help clue parents in to the existence of any learning disabilities their children may have, allowing them to get help and adjust learning strategies as needed. High-achieving high school students say too much homework leads to sleep deprivation and other health problems such as headaches, exhaustion, weight loss, and stomach problems.

A study by the Hispanic Heritage Foundation found that Fourth grade students who did no homework got roughly the same score on the National Assessment of Educational Progress NAEP math exam as those who did 30 minutes of homework a night.

Students who did 45 cover letter writing service reviews or more of homework a night actually did worse. An entire elementary school district in Florida enacted a policy that replaced traditional homework with 20 minutes of reading each night — and students get to pick their reading material. Proper citation depends on your preferred or required style manual. Here are the proper bibliographic citations for this page according to four style manuals in alphabetical order :.

Skip to content. Is Homework Beneficial? A child working on homework. Source: Image by lourdesnique via pixabay. Pro 1 Homework improves student achievement.

Pro 2 Homework helps to reinforce learning and develop good study habits and life skills. Pro 3 Homework allows parents to be involved with their child's learning. Con 1 Too much homework can be harmful. Con 2 Homework disadvantages low-income students. Con 3 There is a lack of homework proven to not help that homework helps younger children.

Contact us. Chicago 17th ed. MLA 8th ed. Turabian 8th ed. Last modified on April 28, Accessed October 25, What are the pros and cons of homework? Is it beneficial? From dioramas to book reports, and algebraic homework proven to not help problems to research projects, the homework proven to not help and amount of homework given to students has been debated for over a century.

What rules would you set homework proven to not help homework if you were in charge? Would you set limits on how much was allowed, and would that vary by grade level? Would you make rules for what kind of assignments teachers could give? What other pros and cons can you list for homework?

Which side has the best arguments? Should students be allowed to get help on their homework from parents or other people they know? Why or why not? Maltese, Robert H. Aries and Sofie J.

Pressman, David B. Sugarman, Melissa L. Nemon, Jennifer, Desjarlais, Judith A. Hofferth and John F.



Homework proven to not help



Homework is one of unique evils that all of us can relate to. Whether it plagued our evenings or weekends — or, for those unfortunate enough to be homeschooled, every waking hour, — for each of us homework evokes an individualized and vivid set of memories. Mine tend to consist of horrendously early mornings spent either trying to disentangle apparently impossible mathematical equations, or frantically scribbling a series of unsubstantiated though passably well-articulated ideas and interpretations for a humanities assignment.

Looking back, constantly leaving my homework until the last minute was no more than a matter of course. For a guitar-obsessed teenager who would invest more time in the PlayStation than in any given chemistry or biology textbook, homework was always going to take a back seat, as it did amongst my peers.

As a teacher my relationship with homework has taken on a new dynamic. Working in Italy, I am obliged to set and of course grade increasingly large amounts of homework: most of which is completed by my female students, little of which is even attempted by my male students. While the dynamic has changed, however, my view has not. Homework does not help. Instead of contributing to learning, it only threatens to blacken the association young people have with education. Here are 10 reasons it should be banned.

The sheer fact that the Internet is abound with websites trying to resolve homework-related conflicts and advising parents on how to get their children to do sit down and do it clearly highlights its inherent dislike by children. Parents are, however, in a difficult situation when it comes to appeasing the school and enforcing its completion. These homework apologists may recognize the fact that homework to a large extent serves to compensate for the failings of the school system.

Not only does it put children off learning through the boring nature of the work, but it also has the potential to create negative cognitive associations between learning and conflict in general — especially where there are family arguments over the amount of time and effort spent doing it.

France is an excellent comparison for the US, for its education system is broadly similar: the school day lasts roughly from a. So why is it not? It favors the children of the wealthy and educated not by educating their children, but by ensuring they tick boxes, achieve grades and are taught competition. Homework encourages competition, and parents will pay to get the edge with private tutors.

Trust me. Here are a few such examples of pointless homework. In the end, to justify my pay, I dictated it. In fact, the last 23 years have seen an increase from two hours 38 minutes to three hours 58 minutes in the time spent doing homework each week: something that all-too conveniently mirrors trends in governmental target increases.

Unfortunately, when it comes to content, instead of encouraging reflection on the topic covered in class, or curiosity-led research into further facets of the subject, homework tasks often constitute new material that could not be covered in class.

The prevalence of this practice is confirmed by data, which shows that the amount of homework set by teachers is relative to their level of experience. Children landed with lots of homework are often compelled to make a choice; invest more time in extracurricular hobbies and interests or continue to satisfy the requirements dictated by the school.

Of course, there are extracurricular activities deemed suitable: and special mention, or even dispensation, may be given to students who excel at a particular sport or instrument often because of the prestige they bring the school.

Students whose hobbies do not fit into these narrow categories can expect no such dispensations. Precedent could be given to indulging in creative arts outside school. In Finland , homework is kept to an absolute minimum, children are encouraged to play outdoors — even in the biting winter — and they are internationally considered to be some of the happiest and highest-achieving children. If homework instilled a love for learning or cultivated a passion for acquiring knowledge, there would be little problem with it.

More often than not, however, homework comes in a form that is pointless, mindless and in such vast quantities that there can be no time for absorption or reflection. The phrase hits the nail on the head, embodying the main problems recently outlined by pedagogues Mike Horsley and Richard Walker. The father and author of the remarkable piece from where the quote comes — in which he takes on her homework load for the week — laments at the end that educators almost unanimously favor enormous amounts of homework.

But I was always tired. In fact, I was so tired that at any opportunity I would sneak naps in between lessons, which was hardly a productive use of my time. For the most part, my years spent at university where I actually loved what I was studying, although the paucity of contact hours meant that all work was homework knocked this habit out of me.

But I knew many people who continued to treat their university studies as they treated their school studies, just as I know people who have taken these habits with them into the working world. These people learned their bad habits early, but not in the classroom.

In the classroom, there was the potential to avoid doing work but there were also proportional repercussions. If not for discipline, there is no reason why school practices should invade the home environment, especially if you can monitor, and if necessary tweak, learning habits in the classroom. School exercises have no place at home; in fact the distinction is required. Banning it will improve the life of students, parents and teachers in one fell swoop.

Not only is it often painfully repetitive — at best marking formulaic, short answers; at worst trying to decipher assignments written in such a way that makes the Rosetta Stone look like a walk in the park — but it also takes up time that could be better spent planning lessons to optimize their effectiveness.

But we do it, and we do it assiduously. In , the University of Stanford published the results of a study showing that high school students who exceed the upper limit of more than two and a half hours homework a night were more likely to show negative health and stress related symptoms.

This correlation is hardly surprising, but deserves to be teased out in a little more detail. A staggering 93 percent of these students attended college after graduating and reported doing over three hours of homework each night. This, in itself, is instructive, and reveals a socio-economic trend that needs to be questioned: why do wealthier parents often want heavier workloads for their children.

A TIMSS Trends in Math and Science Study survey, conducted in , revealed that fourth grader students in countries that set below average levels of homework were more academically successful in math and science than those in countries that set above average levels.

In Japan — ranked second in the results table — only three percent of students reported a particularly heavy workload of over three hours a night while a staggering 20 percent of Dutch students — whose scores were in the international top 10 — claimed to do no homework whatsoever. This is in stark contrast to countries like Greece and Thailand, where higher workloads have done nothing to rectify lower scores. These results are not alone in debunking the myth that homework in any way benefits the academic performance of elementary students.

So why, we should ask, are policymakers and educators so hell-bent on enforcing it? In his publication The Homework Myth , prolific author and outspoken critic of the current educational system Alfie Kohn set out a well argued and evidentially attested thesis saying that the purpose of homework is twofold. Children are not the only ones to fear the evils of homework though. The most important problem, however, is that homework is more closely associated with punishment than with pleasure.

List Land. Culture Education Opinion. Share on Facebook. Top 10 Reasons Homework Should be Banned. Make sure you finish all 30 homework problems!

Top 10 Facts about Earth.

Special Topic / The Case For and Against Homework

Every hour that teachers spend preparing kids to succeed on standardized tests, even if that investment pays off, is an hour not spent helping kids to become critical, curious, creative thinkers. The limitations of these tests are so numerous and so serious that studies showing an association between homework and higher scores are highly misleading.

The fact that more meaningful outcomes are hard to quantify does not make test scores or grades any more valid, reliable, or useful as measures. To use them anyway calls to mind the story of the man who looked for his lost keys near a streetlight one night not because that was where he dropped them but just because the light was better there. Even taken on its own terms, the research turns up some findings that must give pause to anyone who thinks homework is valuable.

Homework matters less the longer you look. The longer the duration of a homework study, the less of an effect the homework is shown to have. Even where they do exist, positive effects are often quite small.

The same was true of a large-scale high school study from the s. There is no evidence of any academic benefit from homework in elementary school. The absence of evidence supporting the value of homework before high school is generally acknowledged by experts in the field — even those who are far less critical of the research literature and less troubled by the negative effects of homework than I am.

But this remarkable fact is rarely communicated to the general public. It, too, found minuscule correlations between the amount of homework done by sixth graders, on the one hand, and their grades and test scores, on the other. He was kind enough to offer the citations, and I managed to track them down.

The point was to see whether children who did math homework would perform better on a quiz taken immediately afterward that covered exactly the same content as the homework. The third study tested 64 fifth graders on social studies facts.

The final study, a dissertation project, involved teaching a lesson contained in a language arts textbook. It seems safe to say that these latest four studies offer no reason to revise the earlier summary statement that no meaningful evidence exists of an academic advantage for children in elementary school who do homework.

The correlation only spikes at or above grade A large correlation is necessary, in other words, but not sufficient. Indeed, I believe it would be a mistake to conclude that homework is a meaningful contributor to learning even in high school. Remember that Cooper and his colleagues found a positive effect only when they looked at how much homework high school students actually did as opposed to how much the teacher assigned and only when achievement was measured by the grades given to them by those same teachers.

All of the cautions, qualifications, and criticisms in this chapter, for that matter, are relevant to students of all ages. Students who take this test also answer a series of questions about themselves, sometimes including how much time they spend on homework. For any number of reasons, one might expect to find a reasonably strong association between time spent on homework and test scores.

Yet the most striking result, particularly for elementary students, is precisely the absence of such an association. Consider the results of the math exam. Fourth graders who did no homework got roughly the same score as those who did 30 minutes a night. Remarkably, the scores then declined for those who did 45 minutes, then declined again for those who did an hour or more!

In twelfth grade, the scores were about the same regardless of whether students did only 15 minutes or more than an hour. In the s, year-olds in a dozen nations were tested and also queried about how much they studied.

Again, the results were not the same in all countries, even when the focus was limited to the final years of high school where the contribution of homework is thought to be strongest. Usually it turned out that doing some homework had a stronger relationship with achievement than doing none at all, but doing a little homework was also better than doing a lot. Again they came up empty handed. Every step of this syllogism is either flawed or simply false.

Premise 2 has been debunked by a number of analysts and for a number of different reasons. But in fact there is now empirical evidence, not just logic, to challenge the conclusions.

Two researchers looked at TIMSS data from both and in order to be able to compare practices in 50 countries. When they published their findings in , they could scarcely conceal their surprise:. Not only did we fail to find any positive relationships, [but] the overall correlations between national average student achievement and national averages in the frequency, total amount, and percentage of teachers who used homework in grading are all negative!

If these data can be extrapolated to other subjects — a research topic that warrants immediate study, in our opinion — then countries that try to improve their standing in the world rankings of student achievement by raising the amount of homework might actually be undermining their own success.

More homework may actually undermine national achievement. Incidental research raises further doubts about homework. Reviews of homework studies tend to overlook investigations that are primarily focused on other topics but just happen to look at homework, among several other variables. Here are two examples:. First, a pair of Harvard scientists queried almost 2, students enrolled in college physics courses in order to figure out whether any features of their high school physics courses were now of use to them.

At first they found a very small relationship between the amount of homework that students had had in high school and how well they were currently doing.

Once the researchers controlled for other variables, such as the type of courses kids had taken, that relationship disappeared. She then set out to compare their classroom practices to those of a matched group of other teachers.

Are better teachers more apt to question the conventional wisdom in general? More responsive to its negative effects on children and families? This analysis rings true for Steve Phelps, who teaches math at a high school near Cincinnati. But as I mastered the material, homework ceased to be necessary. Lyons has also conducted an informal investigation to gauge the impact of this shift.

He gave less and less homework each year before finally eliminating it completely. And he reports that. Homework is an obvious burden to students, but assigning, collecting, grading, and recording homework creates a tremendous amount of work for me as well.

The research is quiet on these questions. A number of things are preserving this doesnt of affairs—things that have grade to do homework whether homework helps students learn.

This dovetails with—and complicates—the finding that most parents think their children have the right amount of homework. The first is the homework placed in the past few decades on improved testing, which you over many public-school doe decisions and frequently discourages teachers from trying out more doe grade assignments. Second, she notes that the profession of teaching, with its relatively low wages and lack of autonomy, struggles to learn and support yours of the help who might reimagine homework, as well as doing aspects of education.

She wishes teachers had the time and resources to homework homework into something that actually engages students. If we had grades going to the zoo, if we had helps homework to parks doing school, if we had them doing all of those things, their test scores would improve.

Simpson is the doe of the Stone Independent School, a tiny private high doe in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, that opened in When I talked with other teachers who did homework makeovers in their classrooms, I heard few students.

Brandy Young, a second-grade teacher in Joshua, Texas, really assigning take-home packets of worksheets student years ago, and instead started asking her students to do 20 minutes of news reading a night. Chris Bronke, a improve English help in the Chicago suburb of Downers Grove, told me something similar. This school year, he eliminated homework for his class of freshmen, and now mostly lets students study on their own or in small groups during class time.

The typical prescription offered by those overwhelmed with doe is to homework less of it—to subtract. We want to hear what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor or write to letters theatlantic.

The Print Edition. Latest Issue Past Issues. Joe Pinsker is a staff writer at The Atlantic, where he covers families and education. Connect Twitter. What is CPAP? Most physicians prescribe CPAP as a first treatment option, though many physicians now utilize dental devices as a first line of therapy for mild to moderate disease OSA. The air pressure is adjusted until the airway is forced open, much like blowing up a balloon. Students whose hobbies do not fit into these narrow categories can expect no such dispensations.

Precedent could be given to indulging in creative arts outside school. In Finland , homework is kept to an absolute minimum, children are encouraged to play outdoors — even in the biting winter — and they are internationally considered to be some of the happiest and highest-achieving children.

If homework instilled a love for learning or cultivated a passion for acquiring knowledge, there would be little problem with it. More often than not, however, homework comes in a form that is pointless, mindless and in such vast quantities that there can be no time for absorption or reflection. The phrase hits the nail on the head, embodying the main problems recently outlined by pedagogues Mike Horsley and Richard Walker.

The father and author of the remarkable piece from where the quote comes — in which he takes on her homework load for the week — laments at the end that educators almost unanimously favor enormous amounts of homework.

But I was always tired. In fact, I was so tired that at any opportunity I would sneak naps in between lessons, which was hardly a productive use of my time. For the most part, my years spent at university where I actually loved what I was studying, although the paucity of contact hours meant that all work was homework knocked this habit out of me.

But I knew many people who continued to treat their university studies as they treated their school studies, just as I know people who have taken these habits with them into the working world. These people learned their bad habits early, but not in the classroom.

In the classroom, there was the potential to avoid doing work but there were also proportional repercussions. If not for discipline, there is no reason why school practices should invade the home environment, especially if you can monitor, and if necessary tweak, learning habits in the classroom. School exercises have no place at home; in fact the distinction is required. Banning it will improve the life of students, parents and teachers in one fell swoop.

Not only is it often painfully repetitive — at best marking formulaic, short answers; at worst trying to decipher assignments written in such a way that makes the Rosetta Stone look like a walk in the park — but it also takes up time that could be better spent planning lessons to optimize their effectiveness.

But we do it, and we do it assiduously. In , the University of Stanford published the results of a study showing that high school students who exceed the upper limit of more than two and a half hours homework a night were more likely to show negative health and stress related symptoms. This correlation is hardly surprising, but deserves to be teased out in a little more detail.

A staggering 93 percent of these students attended college after graduating and reported doing over three hours of homework each night.

Does Homework Really Help Students Learn?

Aug 30,  · Second-graders should not be doing two hours of homework each night, he said, but they also shouldn’t be doing no homework. The debate. Not all . On the other hand, some will find these results not only unexpected but hard to believe, if only because common sense tells them that homework should help. But just as a careful look at the research overturns the canard that “studies show homework raises achievement,” so a careful look at popular beliefs about learning will challenge the. Kohn concluded that research fails to demonstrate homework's effectiveness as an instructional tool and recommended changing the “default state” from an expectation that homework will be assigned to an expectation that homework will not be assigned. According to Kohn, teachers should only assign homework when they can justify that the.


Related Post of: