Rainforest facts primary homework help

Amazon Rainforest

Also called industrial agriculture. Female mammals produce milk to feed their offspring. Also called a green corridor. Also known as petroleum or crude oil. Also called a primeval forest, primary forest, primal forest, or ancient woodland.

Seaweed can be composed of brown, green, or red algae, as well as "blue-green algae," which is actually bacteria. Also called slash-and-burn, milpa and swidden. Also called an alpha predator or apex predator. The audio, illustrations, photos, and rainforest facts primary homework help are credited beneath the media asset, except for promotional images, which generally link to another page that contains the media credit.

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Any interactives on this page can only be played while you are visiting our website. You cannot download interactives. Climate describes the average weather conditions of a particular place over a 30 year period. All places on earth have their own climates.

Different from weather rainforest facts primary homework help, which are short-term and temporary phenomenon, climates are usually steady and predictable, and shape how organisms and human civilizations evolve and adapt in any given rainforest facts primary homework help. However, climates are not always permanent, and can change drastically due to human activity. Creative writing course vanderbilt university the world's climates and how they affect local rainforest facts primary homework help and the planet with this curated collection of resources.

Freshwater is a precious resource on the Earth's surface. It is also home to many diverse fish, plant, and crustacean species. The habitats that freshwater ecosystems provide consist of lakes, rivers, ponds, wetlands, streams, and springs. Trophic levels provide a structure for understanding food chains and how energy flows through an ecosystem. At the base of the pyramid are the producers, who computer science homework help reddit photosynthesis or chemosynthesis to make their own food.

Herbivores or primary consumers, make up the second level. Secondary and tertiary consumers, omnivores and carnivores, follow in the subsequent sections of the pyramid. At each step up the food chain, only 10 percent of the energy is passed on to the next level, while approximately 90 percent of the energy is lost as heat. Teach your students how energy is transferred through an ecosystem with these resources. A biome is an area classified according to the species that live in that location.

Temperature range, soil type, and the amount of light and water are unique to a particular place and form the niches for specific species allowing scientists to define the biome. However, scientists disagree on how many biomes exist. Some count six forest, grassland, freshwater, marine, desert, and tundraothers eight separating two types of forests and adding tropical savannahand still others are more specific and count as many as 11 biomes.

Use these rainforest facts primary homework help to teach middle school students about rainforest facts primary homework help around the world. A biotic factor is a living organism that shapes its environment. In a freshwater ecosystem, examples might include aquatic plants, fish, amphibians, and algae. Biotic and abiotic factors work together to create a unique ecosystem.

Learn more about biotic factors with this curated resource collection. Hunter-gatherer cultures forage or hunt food from their environment. Often nomadic, this was the only way of life for humans until about 12, years ago when archaeologic studies show evidence of the emergence of agriculture.

Human lifestyles began to change as groups formed permanent settlements and tended crops. There are still a few hunter-gatherer peoples today. Explore the lifestyle of hunter-gatherers in your classroom with these resources.

Different regions have access to different renewable or nonrenewable natural resources such as freshwater, fossil fuels, fertile soil, or timber based on their geographic location and past geologic processes. For example, the Great Plains region of the United States is known for its abundance of fertile soil.

As a result, its main industry is agriculture. Corn, soybeans, and wheat are globally exported from this region and serve as the main economy. On the other side of the spectrum, the desert southwestern region of the United States depends on the Central Arizona Project canals to transport water from the Colorado River in order to support agriculture and urban areas. Use these materials to explore the interconnected nature of resources and their distribution.

A habitat is an environment where an organism lives throughout the year or for rainforest facts primary homework help periods of time to find a mate. The habitat contains all an animal needs to survive such as food and shelter.

A microhabitat is a small area which differs somehow from the surrounding habitat. Its unique conditions may be home to unique species that may not be found in the larger region. Unfortunately, some habitats are threatened by pollution, extreme weather, or deforestation. This puts many of the species that live there in danger and is causing many populations to decline. Explore different types of habitats and microhabitats with this curated collection of classroom resources.

A terrestrial ecosystem is a land-based community of organisms and the interactions of biotic and abiotic components in a given area. Examples of terrestrial ecosystems include the tundra, taigas, temperate deciduous forests, tropical rainforests, grasslands, and deserts. The type of terrestrial ecosystem found in a particular place is dependent on the temperature range, the average amount of precipitation received, the soil type, and write my thesis methodology of light it receives.

Use these resources to spark student curiosity in terrestrial rainforest facts primary homework help and discover how different abiotic and biotic factors determine the plants and animals found in a particular place. Rainforests are home to over half of the world's plant and animal species. Learn about tropical and temperate rainforests, how they contribute to the global ecosystem, and the conservation efforts being done to protect these biomes. Students explore biodiversity in the Amazon rainforest using the MapMaker Interactive and other online resources.

Then students construct an argument for protecting biodiversity in the Amazon rainforest. Join our community of educators and receive the latest information on National Geographic's resources for you and your students. Skip to content. Twitter Facebook Pinterest Google Classroom. Encyclopedic Entry Vocabulary. A rainforest is an area of tall, mostly evergreen trees and a high amount of rainforest facts primary homework help.

This makes rainforests astoundingly dense with flora and fauna ; a square-kilometer 4-square-mile patch can contain as many as 1, flowering plants, species of trees, species of birds and species of butterflies. Rainforests thrive on every continent except Antarctica. The tropical islands of Southeast Asia and parts of Australia support dense rainforest habitat s. Rainforests help regulate our climate creative writing on my first bicycle provide us with everyday products.

Citizens, government s, intergovernmental organizations, and conservation groups are working together to protect these rainforest facts primary homework help but fragile ecosystems. Most rainforests are structured in four layers: emergent, canopy, understory, and forest floor. Each layer has unique characteristics based on differing levels of water, sunlight, and air circulation. While each layer is distinctthey exist in an interdependent system: processes and species in one layer influence those in another.

The top layer of the rainforest is the emergent layer. Here, trees as tall as 60 meters feet dominate the skyline. Small, waxy leaves help trees rainforest facts primary homework help the emergent layer retain water during long drought s or dry season s.

Lightweight seeds are carried away from the parent plant by strong wind s. In the Amazon rainforest, the towering trees of the emergent layer include the Brazil nut tree and the kapok tree. The Brazil nut tree, a vulnerable speciescan live up to 1, essay on disobeying an order in undisturbed rainforest habitats.

Unlike many rainforest species, both the Brazil nut tree and the kapok tree are deciduous —they shed their leaves rainforest facts primary homework help the dry season. Rainforest facts primary homework help animals living in the emergent layer of the Amazon rainforest include birds, bats, gliders, and butterflies.

Large raptors, such as white-tailed hawks and harpy eagles, are its top predator s. In rainforests on the island of New Guinea, pygmy gliders populate the emergent layer. Pygmy gliders are small rodent s that get their name from the way flaps rainforest facts primary homework help skin between their legs allow them to glide from branch to branch.

Bats are the most diverse mammal species in most tropical rainforests, and they regularly fly throughout low residency mfa creative writing canada emergent, canopy, and understory layers. Beneath the emergent layer is the canopya deep layer of vegetation roughly 6 meters 20 feet thick.

The canopy blocks winds, rainfall, and sunlight, creating a humidstill, and dark environment below.



Rainforest facts primary homework help



Thick forests found in wet areas of the world are called rainforests. Most people are familiar with hot, tropical rainforests filled with trees that stay green year-round. But there are other kinds of rainforests, too. Temperate rainforests grow in cooler parts of the world, such as the northwestern United States and southern Australia. Monsoon rainforests have a dry season and trees that shed their leaves each year.

They grow in Southeast Asia. Montane rainforests, or cloud forests, grow in mountainous regions. The rest of this article will focus on tropical rainforests because they are important to the health of the entire planet.

Tropical rainforests occur around the equator in the hot, wet region called the tropics. They are found in parts of the tropics that get more than 70 inches centimeters of rain each year.

Tropical rainforests can be divided into several sections. At the top of the forest is a thick layer called the canopy. It is formed by the spreading branches and thick leaves of tall trees. The canopy blocks much of the sunlight from the area below. The canopy can be between and feet 30 and 50 meters above the ground.

A few very tall trees stick up above the rest of the canopy. They are called emergent trees. Many animals and insects live among the treetops of the canopy.

The section below the canopy is called the understory. It contains small trees, shrubs, and plants. Many of these are saplings young trees.

Their stems reach up toward the light. However, these smaller trees generally do not receive enough sunlight to grow into adult trees. On the forest floor, it is usually dark because the canopy blocks so much of the sunlight. For this reason, only plants that can tolerate shade grow there.

So little sunlight reaches the ground that the forest floor may be only lightly covered by ground vegetation. There may be open spaces between the tree trunks. If one of the trees that creates the canopy dies or falls, however, a gap may open in the canopy, allowing sunlight to reach farther down into the forest. In such cases the ground vegetation may become thick and dense. The constant rain washes away many of the nutrients in the soil. To make up for that loss, bacteria, fungi, and insects on the forest floor help to break down dead plants and animals.

This process creates a thin, rich top layer of soil that provides nutrients to the roots of the plants and trees. Because this layer of soil is thin, most of the trees have shallow root systems.

Tropical rainforests are known for the diversity of their plants and animals. Scientists believe that many of these species have not yet been discovered. The trees found in tropical rainforests stay green all year, though they do shed their leaves sometimes.

Palms are among the most common trees. Below the thick canopy, other plants have to compete with each other to get enough light. As a result, many plants use other plants to reach toward the sunlight. For example, woody plants called lianas attach to the stems of other plants and climb from the ground to the canopy. Epiphytes, or air plants, are also abundant in the rainforest. These plants are not attached to the ground.

They live on other plants and get water and minerals from rain and also from debris that collects on the supporting plants. Mosses , ferns , and orchids can often be found attached to larger plants. Each area of the rainforest has thousands of species, or types, of animals. Many plant-eating animals live in the canopy—for example, monkeys , flying squirrels, and sharp-clawed woodpeckers. At the lower levels of the forest are animals that run, flutter, hop, and climb in the undergrowth.

On the rainforest floor are such animals as chimpanzees , gorillas , elephants , pigs , deer , and leopards. Many animals in the rainforest have unusual characteristics. For example, sloths hang upside down, resting for hours at a time. The bright colors of the tiny poison dart frog warn other animals that it is poisonous and should not be eaten.

Other common animals throughout the forests include ants , beetles , snakes , and bats. There are also many brightly colored birds such as toucans , parrots , and macaws. A tropical rainforest is a delicate network of relationships between plants and animals.

Many plants, for instance, rely on animals to spread their pollen from flower to flower. At the same time, animals may depend on plants for their food and shelter. In addition, millions of people live in the forests. For them the forests are sources of food, shelter, and other materials.

Even people who live far away from tropical rainforests are affected by the forests. Many rainforest plants are used as medicines to help treat diseases such as cancer. Scientists believe there are many more plants there that will help treat or even cure serious diseases. In addition, products such as fruits, nuts, rubber, rattan, and wood come from rainforests. Tropical rainforests also help to control the water supply of the areas where they grow.

They do this by absorbing the constant rain and then releasing it slowly back into the atmosphere. Some of the water is released steadily into area rivers. Many people rely on the rivers for their water supply and to irrigate their crops. Some of the water is released back into the air through evaporation. This keeps the air moist and leads to more rain. This important process is called the water cycle. Finally, like all green plants, rainforest plants absorb carbon dioxide gas from the atmosphere and produce oxygen.

They do this through the process of photosynthesis. Tropical rainforests grow in many poor countries. Some poor countries sell the wood and other resources of rainforests to make much-needed money. This often means that entire sections of the forest are destroyed. Rainforests are also cut down or burned away so that the land can be used for other purposes, such as cattle grazing and farming.

The rainforests that are destroyed for these reasons are rarely replaced. The loss of rainforests endangers many plants and animals that live nowhere else in the world.

Over time, some of these plants and animals may become extinct if their rainforest habitat is destroyed. When rainforests are cleared, the water cycle is disrupted as well. Rainwater washes away quickly instead of being stored in the plants and returned slowly to the atmosphere. Eventually, rain falls less often, and the region may experience drought. The destruction of rainforests also affects the environment of the rest of the world. When forests are burned, massive amounts of carbon dioxide escape into the atmosphere.

This carbon dioxide contributes to a problem known as global warming. Take a minute to check out all the enhancements! Choose a language from the menu above to view a computer-translated version of this page. Please note: Text within images is not translated, some features may not work properly after translation, and the translation may not accurately convey the intended meaning.

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Social Studies.

Rainforest habitats

This puts many of the species that live there in danger and is causing many populations to decline. Explore different types of habitats and microhabitats with this curated collection of classroom resources. A terrestrial ecosystem is a land-based community of organisms and the interactions of biotic and abiotic components in a given area.

Examples of terrestrial ecosystems include the tundra, taigas, temperate deciduous forests, tropical rainforests, grasslands, and deserts. The type of terrestrial ecosystem found in a particular place is dependent on the temperature range, the average amount of precipitation received, the soil type, and amount of light it receives.

Use these resources to spark student curiosity in terrestrial ecosystems and discover how different abiotic and biotic factors determine the plants and animals found in a particular place.

Rainforests are home to over half of the world's plant and animal species. Learn about tropical and temperate rainforests, how they contribute to the global ecosystem, and the conservation efforts being done to protect these biomes. Students explore biodiversity in the Amazon rainforest using the MapMaker Interactive and other online resources.

Then students construct an argument for protecting biodiversity in the Amazon rainforest. Join our community of educators and receive the latest information on National Geographic's resources for you and your students.

Skip to content. Twitter Facebook Pinterest Google Classroom. Encyclopedic Entry Vocabulary. A rainforest is an area of tall, mostly evergreen trees and a high amount of rainfall. This makes rainforests astoundingly dense with flora and fauna ; a square-kilometer 4-square-mile patch can contain as many as 1, flowering plants, species of trees, species of birds and species of butterflies.

Rainforests thrive on every continent except Antarctica. The tropical islands of Southeast Asia and parts of Australia support dense rainforest habitat s. Rainforests help regulate our climate and provide us with everyday products.

Citizens, government s, intergovernmental organizations, and conservation groups are working together to protect these invaluable but fragile ecosystems. Most rainforests are structured in four layers: emergent, canopy, understory, and forest floor. Each layer has unique characteristics based on differing levels of water, sunlight, and air circulation. While each layer is distinct , they exist in an interdependent system: processes and species in one layer influence those in another.

The top layer of the rainforest is the emergent layer. Here, trees as tall as 60 meters feet dominate the skyline. Small, waxy leaves help trees in the emergent layer retain water during long drought s or dry season s. Lightweight seeds are carried away from the parent plant by strong wind s. In the Amazon rainforest, the towering trees of the emergent layer include the Brazil nut tree and the kapok tree.

The Brazil nut tree, a vulnerable species , can live up to 1, years in undisturbed rainforest habitats. Unlike many rainforest species, both the Brazil nut tree and the kapok tree are deciduous —they shed their leaves during the dry season. The animals living in the emergent layer of the Amazon rainforest include birds, bats, gliders, and butterflies. Large raptors, such as white-tailed hawks and harpy eagles, are its top predator s.

In rainforests on the island of New Guinea, pygmy gliders populate the emergent layer. Pygmy gliders are small rodent s that get their name from the way flaps of skin between their legs allow them to glide from branch to branch.

Bats are the most diverse mammal species in most tropical rainforests, and they regularly fly throughout the emergent, canopy, and understory layers. Beneath the emergent layer is the canopy , a deep layer of vegetation roughly 6 meters 20 feet thick. The canopy blocks winds, rainfall, and sunlight, creating a humid , still, and dark environment below. Trees have adapt ed to this damp environment by producing glossy leaves with pointed tips that repel water.

While trees in the emergent layer rely on wind to scatter their seeds, many canopy plants, lacking wind, encase their seeds in fruit. Sweet fruit entice s animals, which eat the fruit and deposit seeds on the forest floor as droppings.

With so much food available, more animals live in the canopy than any other layer in the rainforest. The dense vegetation dulls sound, so many—but not all—canopy dwellers are notable for their shrill or frequent vocalizing.

In the Amazon rainforest, canopy fruit is snatched up in the large beaks of screech ing scarlet macaw s and keel-billed toucan s, and picked by barking spider and howler monkeys. The silent two-toed sloth chews on the leaves, shoots, and fruit in the canopy. Thousands and thousands of insect species can also be found in the canopy, from bees to beetles, borers to butterflies. Located several meters below the canopy, the understory is an even darker, stiller, and more humid environment. Plants here, such as palms and philodendron s, are much shorter and have larger leaves than plants that dominate the canopy.

Understory plants often produce flowers that are large and easy to see, such as Heliconia , native to the Americas and the South Pacific.

Others have a strong smell, such as orchids. The fruit and seeds of many understory shrub s in temperate rainforests are edible. The temperate rainforests of North America, for example, bloom with berries. Animals call the understory home for a variety of reasons. Many take advantage of the dimly lit environment for camouflage. The spots on a jaguar found in the rainforests of Central and South America may be mistaken for leaves or flecks of sunlight, for instance. The green mamba, one of the deadliest snakes in the world, blends in with foliage as it slither s up branches in the Congo rainforest.

Many bats, birds, and insects prefer the open airspace the understory offers. Amphibians, such as dazzlingly colored tree frogs, thrive in the humidity because it keeps their skin moist. Gorillas, a critically endangered species of primate , are crucial for seed dispersal. Gorillas are herbivore s that move throughout the dark, dense rainforest as well as more sun-dappled swamp s and jungle s. Their droppings disperse seeds in these sunny areas where new trees and shrubs can take root.

In this way, gorillas are keystone species in many African rainforest ecosystems. The forest floor is the darkest of all rainforest layers, making it extremely difficult for plants to grow.

Leaves that fall to the forest floor decay quickly. Decomposer s, such as termites, slugs, scorpions, worms, and fungi, thrive on the forest floor. Organic matter falls from trees and plants, and these organisms break down the decaying material into nutrient s. The shallow roots of rainforest trees absorb these nutrients, and dozens of predator s consume the decomposers!

Animals such as wild pigs, armadillos, and anteaters forage in the decomposing brush for these tasty insects, roots and tuber s of the South American rainforest.

Even larger predators, including leopards, skulk in the darkness to surprise their prey. Smaller rodents, such as rats and lowland pacas a type of striped rodent indigenous to Central and South America , hide from predators beneath the shallow roots of trees that dominate the canopy and emergent layer.

Rivers that run through some tropical rainforests create unusual freshwater habitats on the forest floor. The Amazon River, for instance, is home to the boto, or pink river dolphin, one of the few freshwater dolphin species in the world. Tropical rainforest s are mainly located between the latitude s of Such humid air produces extreme and frequent rainfall, ranging between centimeters inches per year.

Tropical rainforests are the most biologically diverse terrestrial ecosystems in the world. It is home to around 40, plant species, nearly 1, bird species, 3, types of fish, species of mammals, and 2. Red-bellied piranhas and pink river dolphins swim its waters.

Jewel-toned parrots squawk and fly through its trees. Poison dart frogs warn off predators with their bright colors. Millions of mushrooms and other fungi decompose dead and dying plant material, recycling nutrients to the soil and organisms in the understory. The Amazon rainforest is truly an ecological kaleidoscope , full of colorful sights and sounds.

Temperate rainforest s are located in the mid-latitudes, where temperatures are much more mild than the tropics. Temperate rainforests are found mostly in coast al, mountainous areas. These geographic conditions help create areas of high rainfall.

They are also much less sunny and rainy, receiving anywhere between centimeters inches of rain per year. Rainfall in these forests is produced by warm, moist air coming in from the coast and being trapped by nearby mountains.

Temperate rainforests are not as biologically diverse as tropical rainforests. They are, however, home to an incredible amount of biological productivity, storing up to metric tons of leaves, wood, and other organic matter per hectare metric tons per acre. Temperate rainforests are found along coasts in the temperate zone. A typical four square mile patch of rainforest contains as many as 1, flowering plants, species of trees, species of birds and species of butterflies.

Emergent Layer - very sunny because it is the very top. Only the tallest trees reach this level. Who lives here? Canopy Layer - much of the rain is stopped by the thick foliage. Most trees in the forest grow to this height.

There are plants that grow in the canopy layer. Their roots don't reach the ground. These are called air plants. See photos. Understory Layer - many vines, dense vegetation, not much light. Forest Floor - dark, damp, full of many dead leaves, twigs and dead plants. The forest floor is dark due to the trees above stopping the sunlight from entering the forest. Click here to find out more.

The trees of a tropical rainforest are so densely packed that rain falling on the canopy can take as long as 10 minutes to reach the ground. Learning about Rainforests Listen to the sounds. Learn about the people, plants, and animals that live in these rainforests. All about Rainforests - What is a Rainforest? Many rainforest plants are used as medicines to help treat diseases such as cancer.

Scientists believe there are many more plants there that will help treat or even cure serious diseases. In addition, products such as fruits, nuts, rubber, rattan, and wood come from rainforests. Tropical rainforests also help to control the water supply of the areas where they grow. They do this by absorbing the constant rain and then releasing it slowly back into the atmosphere.

Some of the water is released steadily into area rivers. Many people rely on the rivers for their water supply and to irrigate their crops.

Some of the water is released back into the air through evaporation. This keeps the air moist and leads to more rain. This important process is called the water cycle. Finally, like all green plants, rainforest plants absorb carbon dioxide gas from the atmosphere and produce oxygen. They do this through the process of photosynthesis. Tropical rainforests grow in many poor countries. Some poor countries sell the wood and other resources of rainforests to make much-needed money.

This often means that entire sections of the forest are destroyed. Rainforests are also cut down or burned away so that the land can be used for other purposes, such as cattle grazing and farming.

The rainforests that are destroyed for these reasons are rarely replaced. The loss of rainforests endangers many plants and animals that live nowhere else in the world. Over time, some of these plants and animals may become extinct if their rainforest habitat is destroyed. When rainforests are cleared, the water cycle is disrupted as well. Rainwater washes away quickly instead of being stored in the plants and returned slowly to the atmosphere. Eventually, rain falls less often, and the region may experience drought.

The destruction of rainforests also affects the environment of the rest of the world. When forests are burned, massive amounts of carbon dioxide escape into the atmosphere. This carbon dioxide contributes to a problem known as global warming. Take a minute to check out all the enhancements! Choose a language from the menu above to view a computer-translated version of this page. Please note: Text within images is not translated, some features may not work properly after translation, and the translation may not accurately convey the intended meaning.

Britannica does not review the converted text. To re-enable the tools or to convert back to English, click "view original" on the Google Translate toolbar. Animal Kingdom. Switch Level. Kids Students Scholars. Articles Featured Article. All Categories. Fine Arts. Language Arts. Plants and Other Living Things. Science and Mathematics. Social Studies. Sports and Hobbies. World Religions. Featured Media. Featured Animal.

RAINFOREST FACTS FOR HOMEWORK

About 30 million plant and animal species are found in rainforests. About plant and animal species become extinct each day due to the deforestation of the rainforests. Rainforests absorb and store carbon dioxide. Because of this, scientists believe that protecting rainforests from deforestation could help to reduce global warming. Apr 30,  · Primary forests have often stood for many thousands of years. Their ecosystems have formed over long lengths of time, and exhibit high biodiversity*. In many cases primary forests provide a unique habitat for species that are unable to live anywhere else. * Biodiversity is the number of different species in a particular location. In addition, products such as fruits, nuts, rubber, rattan, and wood come from rainforests. Tropical rainforests also help to control the water supply of the areas where they grow. They do this by absorbing the constant rain and then releasing it slowly back into the atmosphere. Some of the water is released steadily into area rivers.


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