The school run homework help rainforest

Year 6 Rainforest Tasks - Suitable for Homework

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For more details see our Terms and conditions. Animal adaptation. Caring for the environment. Conservation and endangered species. Desert habitats. Forest and woodland habitats. Grassland habitats.

Marine habitats. Polar habitats. Rainforest habitats. Islands and continents. Human habitats. Coastal habitats. The Chinese New Year. Food and farming. Water and the water cycle. Rocks and soil. Fair trade. South Africa. The United States of America. Northern Ireland. Egyptian life and culture. The Great Fire of London. Guy Fawkes and Bonfire Night. History of toys. Houses and homes. Isambard Kingdom Brunel. Julius Caesar.

Life in the Victorian era. London in the s. Pyramids and mummies. Queen Elizabeth I. Queen Victoria. Roman life and culture. The Anglo-Saxons. The Celts. The Normans. Roman Britain and the Roman Empire. The Tudors. The Victorian era. William Shakespeare. Florence Nightingale. The Vikings. Greek life and culture. Greek gods and mythology. World War II.

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The school run homework help rainforest



Polar habitats are located at the very top and very bottom of the Earth. They are cold, windy and have a lot of snow and ice. Tundra takes up a lot of the area of polar habitats. Animals who live in polar regions have adapted by having thick fur or feathers, and hunting fish or each other rather than relying on plants for food.

Insects in the Arctic habitat include:. Conditions that animals are used to and have adapted to are changing, which is making it more difficult for them to survive. Watch a BBC Bitesize video about polar habitats. Read about what life is like in Antarctica. Information about the polar zones for children. Watch a BBC video to see how animals have adapted to live in the polar biome. Read about foodwebs and ecosystems in Antarctica.

See lots of pictures of icebergs and find out more about them. Need help? How to videos Why join? Polar habitats. What are polar habitats? Polar habitats are located in the very north and very south of the globe — the two pole ends of the Earth. The northern polar region is called the Arctic, and in the south the polar region is the continent of Antarctica. Polar habitats have just two seasons — summer and winter but even summer is normally very cold.

Polar habitats have tundra, which is ground that is nearly always frozen. Because it is too cold for trees to grow in arctic habitats, animals find other places to live such as holes in the ground, or in caves made from snow. Most are carnivores they eat meat and hunt for fish as well as smaller animals. Animals in polar regions have adapted to survive in these extreme conditions.

They have thick fur or feathers, blend in with the white snow, or hibernate during the coldest winter months. The mass of ice at the very tip of the north and south Poles is called the polar ice cap. It is always frozen, although the size of the ice cap changes when bits on the edge of it melt during the summer months.

Global warming is changing polar habitats, especially in the Arctic. This means that animals like the polar bear and Arctic fox are becoming endangered. Polar habitats are located on the very top and very bottom of the Earth — the North Pole, which is called the Arctic, and the South Pole, which is the continent of Antarctica.

These are called ice caps, and they are located in the very centre of the Arctic and Antarctica. Tundra is land that only defrosts a tiny bit on the top during the summer, but below that stays frozen all the time.

That always-frozen layer is called permafrost. Just like animals in hot deserts have to know how to stay as cool as possible, animals in polar habitats have to know how to stay as warm as possible.

Some ways that animals in polar habitats stay warm are: Developing a thick layer of fat that keeps them cosy Having thick fur all over their body and feet Having thick layers of feathers Burrowing into the ground or into snowbanks like igloos! Migrating south during the coldest months Hibernating sleeping during the coldest months Look at the gallery below and see if you can spot these images: A map of the world showing where the polar regions are A picture of the food chain in an Arctic tundra habitat Snowy owl Polar bear Caribou Pika Elk Arctic fox Muskox Walrus Beluga whales Orca.

Play a game to find out Take the Antarctic Wilderness Challenge quiz to show what you know Create a polar habitats diorama. Desert habitats. Rainforest habitats. Marine habitats. Conservation and endangered species.

Animal adaptation

Animals and reptiles that live in rainforest habitats include:. Insects and bugs that live in rainforest habitats include:. Rainforest habitats are getting smaller. This is because forests are being destroyed because of mining, cutting down trees to use the wood to make things, building roads and making space for farmland.

All those animals and insects who used to live in those bits of rainforest that have been destroyed have had to find new homes, or have died. The plants that used to be there are gone. The trees also absorb carbon dioxide, which is a greenhouse gas that the Earth has too much of at the moment.

Need help? How to videos Why join? Rainforest habitats. What are rainforest habitats? Rainforest habitats are forests located around the tropics, which is a zone around the equator.

Rainforests are different from other forests in the world because they get a lot of rain every year — this makes them damp and humid. The largest rainforest habitat in the world is the Amazon rainforest in South America. Other layers of the rainforest are emergents, which are trees that grow a bit taller than the canopy; the understory, which is the bit just below the canopy; then shrubs below that; then the ground. London in the s. Pyramids and mummies. Queen Elizabeth I.

Queen Victoria. Roman life and culture. The Anglo-Saxons. The Celts. The Normans. Roman Britain and the Roman Empire. The Tudors. The Victorian era. William Shakespeare. Florence Nightingale. The Vikings. Greek life and culture. Greek gods and mythology. World War II. Life during World War II. World War I and Remembrance Day. Anne Frank and the Holocaust. Alfred the Great. Dr Martin Luther King Jr. Mary Seacole. Nelson Mandela. The Stone Age. The Suffragettes.

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Polar habitats are located in the very north and very south of the globe – the two pole ends of the Earth. The northern polar region is called the Arctic, and in the . The School Run. E-mail or username * Password * Register for free; Looking for child-friendly homework and project help for primary-school children? Meet the Homework Gnome! This free resource covers the most common curriculum topics and offers information, resources and links to further learning. Rainforest habitats. Rivers. Volcanoes. The School Run. E-mail or username * Password * Register for free; So, it’s very important that we help keep rainforest habitats healthy and growing by caring for the environment and not cutting down any more rainforest trees. Words to know: homework gnome. Testimonials.


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