Words for creative writing

400+ Ways to Exploit Facial Expressions in Writing

Words are sacred … If you get the right ones, in the right order, you can nudge the world a little. But for now you probably would just be thrilled if an extra person opens your email or clicks a call to action button. One word or phrase can excite your readers. Or make them curious, scared, furious, and even aroused. Headlines, subject lines, article titles, taglines, product names, call to action statements, proof points, mission statements, blog posts, resumes.

You have to use adjectives and adverbs correctly. They are accents. Accents that can help tremendously. Make it do its job or cut it without mercy or remorse.

Words that start with words for creative writing or that end softly words for creative writing still deliver. Print it out and keep it on your desk. Please share. Leave a comment below. This set of action words is full of positive verbs. Verbs that give your reader energy, enthusiasm, and inspiration.

Loss words for creative writing is a powerful creative writing parkway parade. Download this list here. Take your content marketing and campaign performance to a whole new level. And do so while easily delivering your best creative efforts on-time, without a words for creative writing rush to meet deadlines.

Use this plug-and-play editorial calendar template to expertly publish the right content at the right time. Map high-impact campaigns Execute launches on time Organize assets and resources.

Get results — faster! Grab your free marketing templates here. Home About Contact. Get The Ultimate Editorial Calendar Template Take your content marketing and campaign performance to a whole new level. Download Now. Trackbacks […] Use strong action words — A choice action word can really impact whether a reader takes action or not. Recent Words for creative writing.



Words for creative writing



Pain in the world right now is palpable. We feel the effects of loss and confusion as we struggle to navigate daily uncertainty in the harrowing thick of a global pandemic.

We sense heated waves of anguish emanating from impassioned protests. We feel and recognize urgent demand for changes to unjust systems. We sense the deep generational sufferings at the heart of it all.

In the midst of all the collective pain, you may be experiencing your own personal anguish. Your heartache may be due to the death of someone dear, the loss of that which is so precious. You may be trying to manage loss, grief, and trauma uniquely your own. The universe is all but insisting that we become more intimately acquainted with our own pain and with the pain of those crying out around us. When we do this, we find space for new things to move in—new inspiration, more love, fresh growth; extra space allowing for freedom of movement, ease of breath.

And it makes no difference whether you consider yourself a writer, or even creative: creativity is in our make-up. The act of creation helps us better understand ourselves and our experiences. Making and creating opens sacred flow. Creativity in grief, loss, and trauma helps us express and release feelings that otherwise have no outlet, feelings we ourselves may not understand until we see them before us in a different form.

We can learn new things about ourselves through our writing. We can unearth what has been hidden. We can forge new pathways for our own growth and evolution as human beings. It can be part of a spiritual practice, a meditation in itself. Combining writing with other creative outlets can provide even more insight into your own broken heart as you move toward your natural state of intrinsic wholeness.

Those who endure trauma and grief can find it very difficult to find safe places to fully express feelings, emotions, experiences. Much of this has to do with fear of pain, fear of revisiting our tragedies, but as we ease into our most tender spaces, teasing out words as we go, we begin to know we can trust ourselves in those shadowy spaces.

We also learn to trust in our ability to emerge again into the light. We learn we can breathe through the hurt, allow it to be, and to move.

We learn we can depend on our own strength. We see that we can go safely into the dark and back out again—still whole. Again, and again. If we do not acknowledge and give voice to our heartbreak and pain, we often find ourselves in even darker places, living in smaller, more contracted spaces. Unexpressed grief can be poison. Your own writing can be your safe-space to tell your stories. Accept the invitation to give your own sorrow words. Karla Helbert and Jamie Fueglein.

Her life was irrevocably changed when her son died of a brain tumor in Jamie Fueglein writes every day. He currently teaches fiction writing at the Visual Arts Center of Richmond and holds novel writing workshops. He has also edited many works of… Read More. Other posts in this category. Why Study About Death and Dying? Experience Your Feminine Nature in Yoga.

Reducing Anxiety Amidst a Pandemic.

277 Action Words to Supercharge Your Writing

Anguish Skin bunching around the eyes Clenched jaw Pinched lips Sallow features Facial tics Visible cord s in neck Tensing facial muscles Wincing Grinding teeth Hyperventilating and then blowing into a paper bag.

Cautiousness, wariness Cocked head Narrowed eyes Pursed lips Lowered eyebrows Lifting chin Jutting jaw Chewing on lip Pressing lips together Frowning Gritting teeth Gazing in direction of perceived hazard Glances darting about rather than focusing on anything in particular. Conceit, egotism, narcissism, vanity Pronounced lip-pursing Thrust-out chin Nose in the air Flawless makeup One raised eyebrow Tweezed eyebrows Signs of plastic surgery Downturned corners of the mouth Supercilious gaze through half-lidded eyes Immaculately trimmed beard and mustache.

Depression Tears Inappropriate laughter Lack of eye contact Infrequent blinking Red or moist eyes Vacant stare Downturned lips Slack expression Dark circles under the eyes Head tilted downward. Distraction, preoccupation Audible exhalations Facial tics Darting glances Pale face Forced laughter Lips pressed together Grinding teeth Sighing Glancing askance sideways Chewing on lips, nails, or personal object.

Envy, jealousy Downturned mouth Jutting chin Bared teeth Flared nostrils Pouting Squinting Frequent swallowing Chewing on bottom lip Flushing Glowering Pressing lips together in firm line Gritting teeth Sneering Scrutinizing object of envy or jealousy.

Fear Brows raised and pulled together Eyes frozen open Pale, trembling features Facial tics Lack of eye contact Darting glances Beads of sweat on face Bulging eyes Moist eyes Shaky smile Open mouth Raised brows Rictus grin involuntary fake smile Rapid blinking Squinting Licking the lips Vein s pulsing in neck or temple Chewing on hair, pen, or other personal object.

Flirtatiousness, seductiveness Fluttering eyelashes Coy smile Lopsided grin Slightly narrowed eyes Open mouth with tip of tongue showing Moistening lips with tongue Head turned away or slightly downturned while maintaining eye contact.

Insecurity Excessive makeup Tight-lipped smile Lowered eyebrows Puckered forehead Minimal eye contact Biting nails Chewing on lips Frowning or scowling. Relaxation Gentle smile Smooth forehead Creases beside the eyes A smile that reaches the eyes Direct eye contact without staring but with minimal blinking. Resentfulness Pinched lips Narrowed eyes Lack of eye contact Twisted mouth Curled lip Bared teeth Frowning or scowling Pouting Shaking the head Orange-peel consistency appearing on skin of tightened chin.

Sadism Curled lip Evil grin Clenched jaw Bared teeth Twisted scowl Horizontal wrinkles between eyebrows Lips stretched so tightly over teeth that they seem to disappear. Secrecy, stealthiness Sly smile Faraway look Winking Biting the lip Avoiding eye contact Forcing the lips closed into a firm line.

Surprise Raised and curved brows Wrinkles across the forehead Gaping jaw Wide eyes with the whites showing Blinking. Whenever possible, create original phrases rather than rely on generic beats. For example, a slight smile could be referred to as an almost smile , the ghost of a smile , or an enigmatic quirk of the lips.

Those who endure trauma and grief can find it very difficult to find safe places to fully express feelings, emotions, experiences. Much of this has to do with fear of pain, fear of revisiting our tragedies, but as we ease into our most tender spaces, teasing out words as we go, we begin to know we can trust ourselves in those shadowy spaces. We also learn to trust in our ability to emerge again into the light.

We learn we can breathe through the hurt, allow it to be, and to move. We learn we can depend on our own strength. We see that we can go safely into the dark and back out again—still whole. Again, and again. If we do not acknowledge and give voice to our heartbreak and pain, we often find ourselves in even darker places, living in smaller, more contracted spaces.

Unexpressed grief can be poison. Your own writing can be your safe-space to tell your stories. Accept the invitation to give your own sorrow words. Karla Helbert and Jamie Fueglein.

Her life was irrevocably changed when her son died of a brain tumor in Jamie Fueglein writes every day. He currently teaches fiction writing at the Visual Arts Center of Richmond and holds novel writing workshops.

He has also edited many works of… Read More. Other posts in this category. Why Study About Death and Dying? Experience Your Feminine Nature in Yoga.

Art of writing texts such as novels, short stories and poems which fall outside the bounds of professional, journalistic, academic and technical discourse. fiction. literature. narrative. nonfiction. novels. short stories. works of fiction. fable. Jul 06,  · Combining writing with other creative outlets can provide even more insight into your own broken heart as you move toward your natural state of intrinsic wholeness. What are the challenges of giving our sorrow words? Those who endure trauma and grief can find it very difficult to find safe places to fully express feelings, emotions, experiences. Jul 20,  · Power words are persuasive, descriptive words that trigger a positive or negative emotional response. They can make us feel scared, encouraged, aroused, angry, greedy, safe, or curious. Authors, copywriters, and content marketers use “power words” to spice up their content and compel audiences to take action.


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